Course Descriptions

Note: Not all courses are offered every semester. Consult the Class Schedule for courses being offered during a particular semester.

Course Numbers

Courses numbered 01 through 09 are courses for developmental studies. The credits earned in these courses are not applicable toward associate degree programs; however, upon approval by the Vice President for Academic Affairs, some developmental courses may provide credit applicable to basic occupational diplomas or certificate programs.

Courses numbered 10 through 99 are freshman courses for certificate programs. The credits earned in these courses are applicable toward certificate programs but are not applicable toward an associate degree. Courses numbered 100 through 199 are freshman courses applicable toward associate degrees and certificate programs. Courses numbered 200 through 299 are sophomore courses applicable toward associate degrees and certificate programs. Not all courses are applicable to all programs. If a course is not listed under a particular curriculum, students should consult their advisor or counselor to determine if it will count for degree credit. In general, a course may be taken for credit only two times.

Course Hours

The number of lecture hours in class each week (including lecture, seminar, discussion and online hours) and/or the number of laboratory hours in class each week (including laboratory, shop, supervised practice, and cooperative work experiences) is indicated for each course in the course description. Lecture and laboratory hours in class each week are also called “contact”hours because they represent time spent under the supervision of a faculty member. In addition to the contact hours as listed in the course description, students also must spend time on out-of-class assignments under their own direction. Usually each credit per course requires an average of three hours of out-of-class study each week.

Course Prerequisites/Co-requisites

A prerequisite course serves to promote student success in the related course. When prerequisites are required before enrolling in a course, the prerequisites are identified in the course description. Courses in sequence (identified by numerals I, II, III, and/or IV) usually require the prior course or equivalent be completed before enrolling in the advanced course in the sequence. Exceptions can be made only upon the recommendation of the faculty member and approval by the appropriate Dean of Instruction. When co-requisites are required for a course, usually the co-requisites must be taken at the same time. The prerequisites or their equivalent must be completed satisfactorily before enrolling in a course unless special permission is obtained from the Vice President of Academic Affairs.

Repeating a Course

A student is limited to two enrollments in the same credit course. Should a student need to enroll in the same credit course more than twice, the need must be properly documented on the current semester Registration Form or on the Registration Change Form and include the signature of a Dean of Instruction.

Specific Course Descriptions

A


Accounting

ACC 211: Principles of Accounting I (4 cr.) — Introduces accounting principles with respect to financial reporting. Demonstrates how decision makers use accounting information for reporting purposes. Focuses on the preparation of accounting information and its use in the operation of organizations, as well as methods of analysis and interpretation of accounting information.  Prerequisite: MTE 1-4 or satisfactory score on an appropriate proficiency examination. Lecture 4 hours per week.

ACC 212: Principles of Accounting II (3 cr.) — Introduces accounting principles with respect to cost and managerial accounting. Focuses on the application of accounting information with respect to product costing, as well as its use within the organization to provide direction and to judge performance. Prerequisite: ACC 211. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ACC 215: Computerized Accounting (3 cr.) — Introduces the computer in solving accounting problems. Focuses on operation of computers. Presents the accounting cycle and financial statement preparation in a computerized system and other applications for financial and managerial accounting. Prerequisite: Completed ACC 211 or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ACC 221: Intermediate Accounting I (3 cr.) — Covers accounting principles and theory, including a review of the accounting cycle and accounting for current assets, current liabilities and investments. Introduces various accounting approaches and demonstrates the effect of these approaches on the financial statement users. Prerequisite ACC 212 or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ACC 231: Cost Accounting I (3 cr.) — Studies cost accounting methods and reporting as applied to job order, process, and standard cost accounting systems. Includes cost control and other topics. Prerequisite ACC 212 or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ACC 241: Auditing I (3 cr.) — Presents techniques of investigating, interpreting, and appraising accounting records and assertions. Studies internal control design and evaluation, evidence-gathering techniques and other topics. Prerequisite or co-requisite ACC 212 or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours per week.

Administration of Justice

ADJ 100: Survey of Criminal Justice (3 cr.) — Presents an overview of the United States criminal justice system; introduces the major system components—law enforcement, judiciary and corrections. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ADJ 105: The Juvenile Justice System (3 cr.) — Presents the evolution, philosophy, structures and processes of the American juvenile delinquency system; surveys the rights of juveniles, dispositional alternatives, rehabilitation methods and current trends. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ADJ 110: Introduction to Law Enforcement (3 cr.) — Studies the philosophy and history of law enforcement, presenting an overview of the crime problem and policy response issues. Surveys the jurisdictions and organizations of local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies. Examines qualification requirements and career opportunities in the law enforcement profession. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ADJ 111: Law Enforcement Organization and Administration I (3 cr.) — Teaches the principles of organization and administration of law enforcement agencies. Studies the management of line operations, staff and auxiliary services, investigative, and juvenile units. Introduces the concept of data processing; examines policies, procedures, rules, and regulations pertaining to crime prevention. Surveys concepts of protection of life and property, detection of offenses, and apprehension of offenders. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ADJ 116: Special Enforcement Topics (3 cr.) — Considers contemporary issues, problems, and controversies in modern law enforcement. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ADJ 133: Ethics and the Criminal Justice Professional (3 cr.) — Examines ethical dilemmas pertaining to the criminal justice system, including those in policing, courts and corrections. Focuses on some of the specific ethical choices that must be made by the criminal justice professional. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ADJ 161: Introduction to Computer Crime (3 cr.) — Provides a basic introduction to the nature of computer crimes, computer criminals, relevant law, investigative techniques, and emerging trends. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ADJ 171-172: Forensic Science I-II (4 cr.) — Introduces student to crime scene technology, procedures for sketching, diagramming and using casting materials. Surveys the concepts of forensic chemistry, fingerprint classification/ identification and latent techniques, drug identification, hair and fiber evidence, death investigation techniques, thin-layer chromatographic methods, and arson materials examination. Lecture 3 hours per week. Laboratory 3 hours per week. Total 6 hours per week.

ADJ 201-202: Criminology (3 cr.) —Studies current and historical data pertaining to criminal and other deviant behavior. Examines theories that explain crime and criminal behavior in human society. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ADJ 211: Criminal Law, Evidence and Procedures I (3 cr.) — Teaches the elements of proof for major and common crimes and the legal classification of offenses. Studies the kinds, degrees and admissibility of evidence and its presentation in criminal proceedings with emphasis on legal guidelines for methods and techniques of evidence acquisition. Surveys the procedural requirements from arrest to final disposition in the various American court systems with focus on the Virginia jurisdiction. Part I of II.  Lecture 3 hours per week.

ADJ 212: Criminal Law, Evidence and Procedures II (3 cr.) — Teaches the elements of proof for major and common crimes and the legal classification of offenses.  Studies the kinds, degrees and admissibility of evidence and its presentation in criminal proceedings with emphasis on legal guidelines for methods and techniques of evidence acquisition. Surveys the procedural requirements from arrest to final disposition in the various American course systems with focus on the Virginia jurisdiction. Part II of II.  Prerequisite: Completion of ADJ 211.  Lecture 3 hours per week.

ADJ 225: Courts and the Administration of Justice (3 cr.) — Studies court systems with emphasis on the technical procedures required, from incident occurrence to final disposition of the case, noting the applicable principles of civil and criminal law; focuses on Virginia courts, laws, and procedures. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ADJ 229: Law Enforcement and the Community (3 cr.) — Considers current efforts by law enforcement personnel to achieve an effective working relationship with the community. Surveys and analyzes various interactive approaches of law enforcement agencies and the citizenry they serve. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ADJ 234: Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism (3 cr.) — Surveys the historical and current practices of terrorism that are national, transnational, or domestic in origin. Includes biological, chemical, nuclear, and cyber-terrorism. Teaches the identification and classification of terrorist organizations, violent political groups and issue-oriented militant movements. Examines investigative methods and procedures utilized in counter terrorist efforts domestically and internationally. Prerequisites: ADJ 100. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ADJ 236: Principles of Criminal Investigation (3 cr.) — Surveys the fundamentals of criminal investigation procedures and techniques. Examines crime scene search, collecting, handling and preserving of evidence. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ADJ 243: Homeland Security and Law (3 cr.) — Covers relationships abroad, the mission of federal, state, and local government at home, and the best way to provide for the common defense. Examines HLS and emergency management, FEMA’s place in public policy, law, and management, HLS initiatives, and new partnerships for HLS covering the government, private sector and higher education. Discusses civil rights issues, the USA Patriot Act; future challenges and roles of intelligence agencies; foreign policy aspects and views. Prerequisite: Completed ADJ 111. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ADJ 248 – Probation, Parole, and Treatment (3 cr.) — Surveys the philosophy, history, organization, personnel and functioning of traditional and innovative probation and parole programs; considers major treatment models for clients. Lecture 3 hours per week.

Arabic

ARA 101: Beginning Arabic I (5 cr.) — Introduces understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills and emphasizes basic Arabic sentence structure. Discusses the diversity of cultures in the Arab world. Part I of II. Lecture 5 hours per week. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible.

ARA 102: Beginning Arabic II (5 cr.) — Introduces understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills and emphasizes basic Arabic sentence structure. Discusses the diversity of cultures in the Arab world. Prerequisite: Completed ARA 101. Part II of II. Lecture 5 hours per week.

ARA 201: Intermediate Arabic I (3 cr.) — Continues to develop understanding, speaking, reading and writing skills and emphasizes basic Arabic sentence structure. Discusses the diversity of cultures in the Arab world. Classes are conducted in Arabic. Prerequisite: Completed ARA 102. Part I of II. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ARA 202:  Intermediate Arabic II (3 cr.) — Continues to develop understanding, speaking, reading and writing skills and emphasizes basic Arabic sentence structure. Discusses the diversity of cultures in the Arab world. Classes are conducted in Arabic. Prerequisite: Completed ARA 102. Part II of II. Lecture 3 hours per week.

Art

ART 101-102: History and Appreciation of Art I-II (3 cr.)  — Presents the history and interpretation of architecture, sculpture, and painting. Begins with prehistoric art and follows the development of western civilization to the present. Lecture 3 hours per week. Recommended to be taken in sequence.

ART 106: History of Modern Art (3 cr.) — Surveys the history of modern architecture, sculpture, painting, and graphic arts in representational and nonrepresentational forms. Focuses on the periods and movements that influenced the arts of the twentieth century. Emphasizes contemporary art forms, particularly the interaction between art and society, industry, and design. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ART 116: Design for the Web I (3 cr.) — Introduces the basic elements of web page design: typography, imagery, and color, and examines how they are combined to create effective layouts. Teaches organization of materials, sketching and concept development, site planning and various methods of construction. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ART 120: Beginning Drawing (2 cr.) — Introduces principles and practices of the various media used in drawing. Lecture 1 hour. Studio instruction 2 hours. Total 3 hours per week.

ART 121: Drawing I (4 cr.) — Develops basic drawing skills and understanding of visual language through studio instruction/lecture. Introduces concepts such as proportion, space, perspective, tone and composition as applied to still life, landscape and the figure. Uses drawing media such as pencil, charcoal, ink wash and color media. Includes field trips and gallery assignments as appropriate. Lecture 1-2 hours. Studio instruction 4 hours. Total 5-6 hours per week.

ART 122: Drawing II (4 cr.) — Develops basic drawing skills and understanding of visual language through studio instruction/lecture. Introduces concepts such as proportion, space, perspective, tone and composition as applied to still life, landscape and the figure. Uses drawing media such as pencil, charcoal, ink wash and color media. Includes field trips and gallery assignments as appropriate. Prerequisite: Completed ART 121. Lecture 1-2 hours. Studio instruction 4 hours. Total 5-6 hours per week.

ART 131: Fundamentals of Design I (4 cr.) —Explores the concepts of two- and three-dimensional design and color. May include field trips as required. Lecture 1-2 hours. Studio instruction 4 hours. Total 5-6 hours per week.

ART 132: Fundamentals of Design II (4 cr.) —Explores the concepts of two- and-three dimensional design and color. May include field trips as required. Prerequisite: Completed ART 131. Lecture 1-2 hours.  Studio instruction 4 hours. Total 5-6 hours per week.

ART 141: Typography I (4 cr.) — Studies the history of letter forms and typefaces and examines their uses in contemporary communications media. Emphasizes applications to specific design problems. Includes identification and specification of type, copy fitting and hands-on typesetting problems. Prerequisite: Completed ART 131 and ART 180 or divisional approval. Lecture 1-2 hours. Studio instruction 4 hours. Total 5-6 hours per week.

ART 180: Introduction to Computer Graphics (3 cr.) — Provides a working introduction to computer-based electronic technology used by visual artists and designers. Presents the basics of operating platforms and standard industry software. Introduces problems in which students can explore creative potential of the new electronic media environment. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

ART 203: Animation I (3-4 cr.) – Introduces the student to the basic techniques of animation, combining traditional and computer-generated skills. Teaches theoretical elements of the aesthetics of sequential imagery. Provides practical experience in two-dimensional and/or three-dimensional animation. Exposes the student to a variety of animation techniques. Lecture 2 hours.  Lab 2-4 hours. Total 4-6 hours per week.

ART 241: Painting I (4 cr.) — Introduces abstract and representational painting in acrylic and/or oil with emphasis on color composition and value. Prerequisite: Completed ART 122 or division approval. Lecture 1- 2 hours. Studio instruction 4 hours. Total 5-6 hours per week.

ART 242: Painting II (4 cr.) – Introduces abstract and representational painting in acrylic and/or oil with emphasis on color composition and value. Prerequisite: Completed ART 241. Lecture 1-2 hours.  Studio instruction 4 hours. Total 5-6 hours per week.

ART 265: Graphic Techniques (4 cr.) — Applies the study of printing processes to the preparation of artwork. Teaches printing processes, terminology, and related materials. Prerequisite: Completed ART 131 and ART 180. Lecture 2 hours. Studio instruction 4 hours. Total 6 hours per week. Please see an advisor for more information.

ART 275: Relief Printmaking (4 cr.) — Introduces relief print making techniques including woodcut, linocut, and collograph. Includes field trips when applicable. Lecture 2 hours. Prerequisite: Completion of ART 131 and ART 180.

ART 283: Computer Graphics I (4 cr.) — Utilizes microcomputers and software to produce computer graphics. Employs techniques learned to solve studio projects which reinforce instruction and are appropriate for portfolio use. Prerequisite: ART 131 and ART 180. Lecture 1-2 hours. Studio instruction 3-4 hours. Total 5-6 hours per week.

ART 284: Computer Graphics II (4 cr.) – Utilizes microcomputers and software to produce computer graphics. Employs techniques learned to solve studio projects which reinforce instruction and are appropriate for portfolio use. Prerequisite: Completed ART 283. Lecture 1-2 hours.  Studio instruction 3-4 hours. Total 5-6 hours per week.

ART 287: Portfolio and Resume Preparation (1 cr.) — Focuses on portfolio preparation, resume writing, and job interviewing for students. Recommended for final semester program students. Requires instructor’s approval. Lecture 1-2 hours. Studio instruction 0-4 hours. Total 1-6 hours per week.

American Sign Language

ASL 101: American Sign Language I (3 cr.) — Introduces the fundamentals of American Sign Language (ASL) used by the Deaf Community, including basic vocabulary, syntax, fingerspelling, and grammatical non manual signals. Focuses on communicative competence. Develops gestural skills as a foundation for ASL enhancement. Introduces cultural knowledge and increases understanding of the Deaf Community. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ASL 102: American Sign Language II (3 cr.) – Introduces the fundamentals of American Sign Language (ASL) used by the Deaf Community, including basic vocabulary, syntax, fingerspelling, and grammatical non manual signals.  Focuses on communicative competence. Develops gestural skills as a foundation for ASL enhancement. Introduces cultural knowledge and increases understanding of the Deaf Community. Prerequisite: Completed ASL 101 or satisfactory score on appropriate proficiency exam. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ASL 125: History and Culture of the Deaf Community I (3 cr.) — Presents an overview of various aspects of Deaf Culture, including educational and legal issues. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Completed ASL 101.

ASL 195: Topics in (1-5 cr.) — Provides an opportunity to explore topical areas of interest to or needed by students. May be used also for special honors courses. May be repeated for credit.

ASL 201-202: American Sign Language III-IV (3 cr.) —Develops vocabulary, conversational competence, and grammatical knowledge with a total immersion approach. Introduces increasingly complex grammatical aspects including those unique to ASL. Discusses culture and literature. Contact with the Deaf Community is encouraged to enhance linguistic and cultural knowledge. Prerequisite for ASL 201: Completed ASL 102. Prerequisite for ASL 202: Completed ASL 201. Lecture 3 hours per week.

Automotive

AUT 100: Introduction to Automotive Shop Practices (2 cr.) — Introduces shop practices for automotive laboratory and shop safety, identification and use of hand tools, general power equipment and maintenance of automotive shop. Explains basic operation procedures of standard shop equipment. Presents Occupational Safety and Health Act standards pertaining to the automotive field. Lecture 2 hours per week. Co-requisite MTH 1 or Prerequisite: Completed MTE 1-3.

AUT 111-112: Automotive Engines I-II (4 cr.) — Presents analysis of power, cylinder condition, valves and bearings in the automotive engine to establish the present condition, repairs or adjustments. Lecture 2-3 hours. Laboratory 2-3 hours. Total 4-6 hours per week. Prerequisite: Completed MTE 1-3 or MTH 1.

AUT 121-122: Automotive Fuel Systems I-II (4 cr.) — Analyzes major domestic and foreign automotive fuel systems to include carburetors and fuel injection systems. Includes detailed inspection and discussion of fuel tanks, connecting lines, instruments, filters, fuel pumps, superchargers, and turbo charger. Also includes complete diagnosis, troubleshooting, overhaul and factory adjustment procedures of all major carbureted and fuel injection systems. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0-3 hours. Total 3-6 hours per week. Prerequisite: Completed MTE 1-3 or MTH 1.

AUT 136: Automotive Vehicle Inspection (2 cr.) — Presents information on methods for performing automotive vehicle safety inspection. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Completed MTE 1-3 or MTH 1.

AUT 141-142: Auto Power Trains I-II (4 cr.) — Presents operation, design, construction and repair of power train components, standard and automatic transmission. Includes clutches, propeller shaft, universal joints, rear axle assemblies, fluid couplings, torque converters as well as 2, 3, and 4 speed standard, overdrive and automatic transmissions. Lecture 2-3 hours. Laboratory 2-6 hours. Total 4-8 hours per week. Prerequisite: Completed MTE 1-3 or MTH 1.

AUT 236: Automotive Climate Control (4 cr.) — Introduces principles of refrigeration, air conditioning controls and adjustment and general servicing of automotive air conditioning systems. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week. Prerequisite: Completed MTE 1-3 or MTH 1.

AUT 241: Automotive Electricity I (4 cr.) — Introduces electricity and magnetism, symbols and circuitry as applied to the alternators, regulators, starters, lighting systems, instruments and gauges and accessories. Lecture 2-3 hours. Laboratory 2-3 hours. Total 4-6 hours per week. Prerequisite: Completed MTE 1-3 or MTH 1.

AUT 245: Automotive Electronics (4 cr.) — Introduces field of electronics as it applies to the modern automobile. Emphasizes basic circuit operation, diagnosis and repair of digital indicator and warning systems. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0-3 hours. Total 3-6 hours per week. Prerequisite: Completed MTE 1-3 or MTH 1.

AUT 266: Auto Alignment, Suspension and Steering (4 cr.) — Introduces use of alignment equipment in diagnosing, adjusting, and repairing front and rear suspensions. Deals with repair and servicing of power and standard steering systems. Lecture 1-2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Total 7-8 hours per week. Prerequisite: Completed MTE 1-3 or MTH 1.

AUT 267: Automotive Suspension and Braking Systems (4 cr.) — Presents the operation, design, construction, repair and servicing of braking and suspension systems. Explains use of tools and test equipment, evaluation of test results, estimation and repair cost, front and rear suspension alignment, power and standard steering, and power, standard and disc brakes. Lecture 2-3 hours. Laboratory 2-3 hours. Total 4-6 hours per week. Prerequisite: Completed MTE 1-3 or MTH 1.

AUT 290: Coordinated Internship (1-5 cr.) — Supervises on-the-job training in selected business, industrial or service firms coordinated by the college. Credit/practice ratio not to exceed 1:5 hours. May be repeated for credit. Variable hours. Prerequisite: Completed MTE 1-3 or MTH 1.

B


Biology

BIO 101: General Biology I (4 cr.) — Focuses on foundations in cellular structure, metabolism, and genetics in an evolutionary context. Explores the core concepts of evolution; structure and function; information flow, storage and exchange; pathways and transformations of energy and matter; and systems biology. Emphasizes process of science, interdisciplinary approach, and relevance of biology to society. Prerequisite: Complete MTE 1-5 and ENG 111 eligible.  Recitation and laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.  May be waived as the prerequisite for BIO 141 for Allied Health students only if the student has taken one unit of high school biology with lab within five years. .

BIO 102: General Biology II (4 cr.) – Focuses on diversity of life, anatomy and physiology of organisms, and ecosystem organization and processes in an evolutionary context. Explores the core concepts of evolution; structure and function; information flow, storage and exchange; pathways and transformations of energy and matter; and systems biology. Emphasizes process of science, interdisciplinary approach, and relevance of biology to society. Part II of a two-course sequence. Prerequisite: Completion of BIO 101. Recitation and laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

BIO 141: Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4 cr.) — Integrates anatomy and physiology of cells, tissues, organs, and systems of the human body. Integrates concepts of chemistry, physics, and pathology. Part I of II. Prerequisites for BIO 141: ENG 111 eligible and BIO 101 (or BIO 101 equivalence), OR for Allied Health students only: ENG 111 eligible and two units of college prep high school science with a grade of “C”or better within the last 5 years, OR permission of department or instructor. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2-3 hours. Total 5-6 hours per week.

BIO 142: Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4 cr.) – Integrates anatomy and physiology of cells, tissues, organs, and systems of the human body. Integrates concepts of chemistry, physics, and pathology.  Part II of II. Prerequisite:  Completed of BIO 141. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2-3 hours. Total 5-6 hours per week.

BIO 149: Microbiology for Allied Health (1 cr.) — Studies the characteristics of microorganisms that are especially important to programs in the Allied Health fields. This course also emphasizes these characteristics in regard to individual and community health. Prerequisites: ENG 111 eligible, MTE 1-5. Lecture 1 hour per week.

BIO 150:  Introductory Microbiology (4 cr.) – Studies the general characteristics of microorganisms. Emphasizes their relationships to individual and community health.  Prerequisites: ENG 111 eligible, MTE 1-5. Co-requisite: BIO 141/142 for allied health majors. Recitation and laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

BIO 205: General Microbiology (4 cr.) — Examines morphology, genetics, physiology, ecology, and control of microorganisms. Emphasizes application of microbiological techniques to selected fields. Prerequisites: Completed ENG 111 and BIO 102 and CHM 112 or departmental approval. Lecture 3 hours. Recitation and laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

BIO 206: Cell Biology (4 cr.) — Introduces the ultrastructure and functions of cells. Emphasizes cell metabolism, cell division, and control of gene expression. Prerequisite: one year of college biology and one year of college chemistry. Lecture 3 hours. Recitation and laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

BIO 226: Vertebrate Zoology (4 cr.) — Focuses on structure, embryology, function, ecology, classification, and evolution of vertebrate animals. Prerequisite: Completed BIO 102. Lecture 3 hours. Recitation and laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

BIO 231-232: Human Anatomy and Physiology I-II (4 cr.) — Integrates the study of gross and microscopic anatomy with physiology, emphasizing the analysis and Interpretation of physiological data. Prerequisites: Completed one year of college biology and one year of college Chemistry or divisional approval. Lecture 3 hours. Recitation and laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

BIO 256: General Genetics (4 cr.) — Explores the principles of genetics ranging from classical Mendelian inheritance to the most recent advances in the biochemical nature and function of the gene. Includes experimental design and statistical analysis. Prerequisite: Completed BIO 102 or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours.  Recitation and laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

BIO 275: Marine Ecology (4 cr.) — Applies ecosystem concepts to marine habitats. Includes laboratory and field work. Prerequisite: Completed BIO 102 or divisional approval. Lecture 3 hours. Recitation and laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

BIO 285: Biological Problems in Contemporary Society (3 cr.) — Discusses major biological problems facing society which may include environmental and health concerns such as pollution, bioengineering, drug abuse, conservation, famine and others. Lecture 3 hours per week.

BIO 299: Supervised Study (1 cr.) — Capstone Presentation: Assigns a project for independent study incorporating previous instruction and supervised by the instructor. Corequisite: a 200 level science course.

Basic Skills

BSK 1: Whole Numbers — Covers whole number principles and computations.  Develops the mathematical mastery necessary for MTE 1. Credit not applicable toward graduation. Total 4 hours per week. 1 credit. Prerequisite: Tested into BSK 1 with the VPT Math Placement Test.

BSK 41: Language Arts, Level 1 — Introduces basic reading and writing skills in preparation for subsequent courses by focusing on vocabulary development (simple phonics, dictionary skills), conventions of Standard English (basic grammar, punctuation, sentence structure), reading comprehension (reading process, topics), study skills (time management, textbook format), and critical thinking skills (fact and opinion). Lecture 0-2 hours. Laboratory 0-4 hours. Total 2-4 hours per week. Prerequisite: Tested into BSK 41 with the VPT English Placement Test.

Business Management

BUS 100: Introduction to Business (3 cr.) — Presents a broad introduction to the functioning of business enterprise within the U.S. economic framework. Introduces economic systems, essential elements of business organization, production, human resource management, and marketing, finance, and risk management. Develops business vocabulary. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible.
BUS 111: Principles of Supervision I (3 cr.) — Teaches the fundamentals of supervision, including the primary responsibilities of the supervisor. Introduces factors relating to the work of supervisor and subordinates. Covers aspects of leadership, job management, work improvement, training and orientation, performance evaluation, and effective employee/ supervisor relationships. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible.

BUS 116: Entrepreneurship (3 cr.) — Presents the various steps considered necessary when going into business. Includes areas such as product-service analysis, market research evaluation, setting up books, ways to finance startup, operations of the business, development of business plans, buyouts versus starting from scratch, and franchising. Uses problems and cases to demonstrate implementation of these techniques. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible.

BUS 117: Leadership Development (3 cr.) — Covers interpersonal relations in hierarchical structures. Examines the dynamics of teamwork, motivation, handling change and conflict and how to achieve positive results through others. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible.

BUS 121: Business Mathematics I (3 cr.) — Applies mathematical operations to business processes and problems. Reviews operations, equations, percentages, sales and property taxes, insurance, checkbook and cash records, wage and payroll computations, depreciation, overhead, inventory turnover and valuation, financial statements, ratio analysis, commercial discounts, markup, and markdown. Prerequisite: MTE 1-4 or satisfactory score on an appropriate proficiency examination. Lecture 3 hours per week.

BUS 122: Business Mathematics II (3 cr.) — Applies mathematical operations to business processes and problems. Reviews basic statistics, distribution of profit and loss in partnerships, distribution of corporate dividends, simple interest, present value, bank discount notes, multiple payment plans, compound interest, annuities, sinking funds, and amortization. Prerequisite: Completed BUS 121. Lecture 3 hours per week.

BUS 165: Small Business Management (3 cr.) — Identifies management concerns unique to small businesses. Introduces the requirements necessary  to initiate a small business and identifies the elements comprising a business plan. Presents information establishing financial and administrative controls, developing a marketing strategy, managing business operations, and the legal and government relationships specific to small businesses. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible.

BUS 200: Principles of Management (3 cr.) — Teaches management and the management functions of planning, organizing, leading and controlling. Focuses on application of management principles to realistic situations managers encounter as they attempt to achieve organizational objectives. Prerequisite: Completed BUS 100 or BUS 165 or college approval. Lecture 3 hours per week.

BUS 201: Organizational Behavior (3 cr.) — Presents a behaviorally oriented course combining the functions of management with the psychology of leading and managing people. Focuses on the effective use of human resources through understanding human motivation and behavior patterns, conflict management and resolution, group functioning and process, the psychology of decision- making, and the importance of recognizing and managing change. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible and Completed BUS 200 or college approval. Lecture 3 hours per week.

BUS 205: Human Resource Management (3 cr.) — Introduces employment, selection, and placement of personnel, forecasting, job analysis, job descriptions, training methods and programs, employee evaluation systems, compensation, benefits, and labor relations. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible.  Lecture 3 hours per week.

BUS 220: Introduction to Business Statistics (3 cr.) — Introduces statistics as a tool in decision making. Emphasizes ability to collect, present, and analyze data. Employs measures of central tendency and dispersion, statistical inference, index numbers, probability theory, and time series analysis. Prerequisite: Completed BUS 122 and ENG 111 eligible or college approval. Lecture 3 hours per week.

BUS 236: Communication in Management (3 cr.) — Introduces the functions of communication in management with emphasis on gathering, organizing and transmitting facts and ideas. Teaches the basic technique of effective oral and written communication. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible.

BUS 241: Business Law I (3 cr.) — Develops a basic understanding of the US business legal environment. Introduces property and contract law, agency and partnership liability, and government regulatory law. Students will be able to apply these legal principles to landlord/tenant disputes, consumer rights issues, employment relationships, and other business transactions. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible.  Lecture 3 hours per week.

BUS 242: Business Law II (3 cr.) — Focuses on business organization and dissolution, bankruptcy and Uniform Commercial Code. Introduces international law and the emerging fields of Ecommerce and Internet Law. Prerequisite: Completed BUS 241 or approval by the Dean of Instruction. Lecture 3 hours per week. Should be taken in sequence.

BUS 265: Ethical Issues in Management (3 cr.) — Examines the legal, ethical, and social responsibilities of management. May use cases to develop the ability to think and act responsibly. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible.

BUS 280: Introduction to International Business (3 cr.) — Studies the problems, challenges, and opportunities which arise when business operations or organizations transcend national boundaries. Examines the functions of international business in the economy, international and transnational marketing, production, and financial operations. Prerequisite: Completed BUS 100 and ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

BUS 290: Coordinated Internship (1-5 cr.) — Supervises on-the-job training in selected business, industrial or service firms coordinated by the college. Credit/practice ratio not to exceed 1:5 hours. May be repeated for credit. Variable hours. Prerequisite: Any 15 credit hours.

C


Childhood Development

CHD 118: Language Arts for Young Children (3 cr.) — Presents techniques and methods for encouraging the development of language and perceptual skills in young children. Stresses improvement of vocabulary, speech and methods to stimulate discussion. Surveys children’s literature, examines elements of quality storytelling and story reading, and stresses the use of audio-visual materials. Prerequisite: Placement into ENF 1. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

CHD 119: Introduction to Reading Methods (3 cr.)— Introduces current practices of teaching reading in the elementary school. Familiarizes students with materials currently in use, emphasizes observation of various reading techniques and trends in the classroom. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

CHD 120: Introduction to Early Childhood Education (3 cr.) — Introduces early childhood development through activities and experiences in nursery, pre-kindergarten, kindergarten, and primary programs. Investigates classroom organization and procedures, and use of classroom time and materials, approaches to education for young children, professionalism, and curricular procedures. Prerequisite: Placement into ENF 1. Lecture 3 hours per week.

CHD 145: Teaching Art, Music, and Movement to Children (3 cr.) — Provides experiences in developing the content, methods, and materials for directing children in art, music, and movement activities. Prerequisite: Placement into ENF 1. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

CHD 146: Math, Science and Social Studies for Children (3 cr.) — Provides experiences in developing the content, methods, and materials for directing children in math, science, and social studies activities. Prerequisite: Placement into ENF 1. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

CHD 165: Observation and participation in Early Childhood/Primary Settings (3 cr.) — Observes and participates in early childhood settings such as child care centers, pre-schools, Montessori schools or public schools in Kindergarten through 3rd grade levels. Students spend one hour each week in a seminar session in addition to 60 clock hours in the field. May be taken again for credit Prerequisite: Placement into ENF 1. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

CHD 166: Infant and Toddler Programs (3 cr.) — Examines the fundamentals of infant and toddler development, including planning and implementing programs in group care. Emphasizes meeting physical, social, emotional, and cognitive needs: scheduling, preparing age-appropriate activities, health and safety policies, record keeping, and reporting to parents. Prerequisite: Placement into ENF 1. Lecture 3 hours per week.

CHD 167: CDA Theories and Applications (3cr.) — Supports the CDA candidate in organizing and developing a portfolio for presentation at local assessment team meeting. Prerequisite: Placement into ENF 1. Lecture 3 hours per week.

CHD 205: Guiding the Behavior of Children (3 cr.) — Explores positive ways to build self-esteem in children and help them develop self-control. Presents practical ideas for encouraging pro-social behavior in children and emphasizes basic skills and techniques in classroom management. Prerequisite: Placement into ENF 1. Lecture 3 hours per week.

CHD 210: Introduction to Exceptional Children (3 cr.) — Reviews the history of education for exceptional children. Studies the characteristics associated with exceptional children. Explores positive techniques for managing behavior and adapting materials for classroom use. Prerequisite: Placement into ENF 1. Lecture 3 hours per week.

CHD 215: Models of Early Childhood Programs (3 cr.) — Studies and discusses the various models and theories of early childhood education programs including current trends and issues. Presents state licensing and staff requirements. Prerequisite: Placement into ENF 1. Lecture 3 hours per week.

CHD 216: Early Childhood Programs, School, and Social Change (3 cr.)
— Explores methods of developing positive, effective relations between staff and parents to enhance the developmental goals of home and school. Reviews current trends and issues in education, describes symptoms of homes in need of support, investigates non-traditional family and cultural patterns, and lists community resources. Prerequisite: Placement into ENF 1. Lecture 3 hours per week.

CHD 265: Advanced Observation and Participation in Early Childhood/ Primary Settings (3 cr.) — Observes and participates in early childhood settings such as child care centers, pre-school, Montessori schools, or public school settings (kindergarten through third grade). Emphasizes planning and implementation of appropriate activities and materials for children. Students will spend one hour each week in a seminar session in addition to 60 clock hours in the field. May be taken again for credit. Prerequisite: Placement into ENF 1. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

CHD 270: Administration of Childcare Programs (3 cr.) — Examines the skills needed for establishing and managing early childhood programs. Emphasizes professionalism and interpersonal skills, program planning, staff selection and development, creating policies, budgeting, and developing forms for record keeping. Prerequisite: Placement into ENF 1. Lecture 3 hours per week.

CHD 298: Seminar and Project (3 cr.) — Examines the skills needed for establishing and managing early childhood programs. Emphasizes professionalism and interpersonal skills, program planning, staff selection and development, creating policies, budgeting, and developing forms for record keeping. Prerequisite: Placement into ENF 1. Lecture 3 hours per week.

Chinese

CHI 101: Beginning Chinese I (5 cr.) — Introduces understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills; emphasizes basic Chinese sentence structure. Part I of II.  Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 5 hours per week.

CHI 102: Beginning Chinese II (5 cr.) — Introduces understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills; emphasizes basic Chinese sentence structure. Prerequisite: CHI 101. Part II of II. Lecture 5 hours per week.

CHI 201: Conversational Chinese (Mandarin) I (4 cr.) — Offers intensive practice in comprehending and speaking Chinese, with emphasis on developing structure and fluency. Prerequisite CHI 102. Part I of II. Lecture 4 hours per week.

CHI 202: Conversational Chinese (Mandarin) II (4 cr.) — Offers intensive practice in comprehending and speaking Chinese, with emphasis on developing structure and fluency. Prerequisite: Completed CHI 102 and CHI 201. Part II of II. Lecture 4 hours per week.

Chemistry

CHM 101: Introductory Chemistry I (4 Cr.) — Emphasizes experimental and theoretical aspects of inorganic, organic, and biological chemistry. Discusses general chemistry concepts as they apply to issues within our society and environment. Designed for the non-science major. Prerequisite for CHM 101: MTE 1-5 and ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

CHM 102:  Introductory Chemistry II (4 cr.) – Emphasizes experimental and theoretical aspects of inorganic, organic, and biological chemistry. Discusses general chemistry concepts as they apply to issues within our society and environment. Designed for the non-science major.  Prerequisite: Completed CHM 101 or CHM 111 with a“C”or better. Lecture 3 hours.  Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week. Limited offerings.

CHM 111: General Chemistry I (4 cr.) — Explores the fundamental laws, theories, and mathematical concepts of chemistry. Designed primarily for science and engineering majors. Requires a strong background in mathematics. Prerequisite: MTE 1-9 or minimum placement recommendation for MTH 163/167 and ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

CHM 112: General Chemistry II (4 cr.) – Explores the fundamental laws, theories, and mathematical concepts of chemistry. Designed primarily for science and engineering majors. Requires a strong background in mathematics. Prerequisite: Completed CHM 111 with a“C”or better. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

CHM 125: Chemistry for Nurses (3 cr.) — Introduces the basic concepts of general, organic, and biological chemistry necessary for practicing nurses. Prerequisite: MTE 1-3, or satisfactory score on an appropriate proficiency examination. Lecture 3 hours per week.

CHM 241: Organic Chemistry I (3 cr.) — Introduces fundamental chemistry of carbon compounds, including structures, physical properties, syntheses, and typical reactions. Emphasizes reaction mechanisms. Prerequisite for CHM 241: Completion of CHM 112. Co-requisite: CHM 245. Lecture 3 hours per week.

CHM 242: Organic Chemistry II (3 cr.) — Introduces fundamental chemistry of carbon compounds, including structures, physical properties, syntheses, and typical reactions. Emphasizes reaction mechanism.  Prerequisite: Completed CHM 241.  Co-requisite: CHM 246. Lecture 3 hours a week.

CHM 245: Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (2 cr.) — Includes qualitative organic analysis. Prerequisite: Completion of CHM 112. Co-requisite: CHM 241. Laboratory 4 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

CHM 246: Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (2 cr.) — Includes qualitative organic analysis. Prerequisite: Completed CHM 245.  Co-requisite: CHM 242. Laboratory 4 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

CHM 260: Introductory Biochemistry (3 cr.) — Explores fundamentals of biological chemistry. Includes study of macromolecules, metabolic pathways, and biochemical genetics. Prerequisite: Completion of CHM 112 or divisional approval. Lecture 3 hours per week.

CHM 299: Supervised Study (1 cr.) – Capstone Presentation: Assigns a project for independent study incorporating previous institution and supervised by the instructor. Co-requisite: a 200 level science course.

Civil Engineering Technology

CIV 171: Surveying I (3 cr.) — Introduces surveying equipment, procedures and computations including adjustment of instruments, distance measurement, leveling, angle measurement, traversing, traverse adjustments, area computations and introduction to topography. Prerequisite: MTH 104 or divisional approval. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

Communication Studies

CST 100: Principles of Public Speaking (3 cr.) — Applies theory and principles of public address with emphasis on preparation and delivery. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible.  Lecture 3 hours per week.

CST 110: Introduction to Speech Communication (2-3 cr.) — Examines the elements affecting speech communication at the individual, small group, and public communication levels with emphasis on practice of communication at each level. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

CST 126: Interpersonal Communication (3 cr.) — Teaches for both daily living and the world of work. Includes perception, self-concept, self-disclosure, listening and feedback non-verbal communication, attitudes, assertiveness and other interpersonal skills. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible.  Lecture 3 hours per week.

CST 130: Introduction to the Theatre (3 cr.) — Surveys the principles of drama, the development of theatre production, and selected plays to acquaint the student with various types of theatrical presentations. Lecture 3 hours per week.

CST 229: Intercultural Communication (3 cr.) — Emphasizes the influence of culture on the communication process including differences in values, message systems, and communication rules. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

Computer Aided Design

CAD 151: Engineering Drawing Fundamentals I (3 cr.) — Introduces technical drafting from the fundamentals through advanced drafting practices. Includes lettering, geometric construction, technical sketching, orthographic projection, sections, intersections, development, and fasteners. Teaches theory and application of dimensioning and tolerances, pictorial drawing, and preparation of drawings. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4-6 hours. Total 5-7 hours per week.

CAD 175: Schematics and Mechanical Drawings (2 cr.) — Covers interpretation of basic shop drawings, conventional symbols, common electrical and electronics symbols, wiring diagrams, hydraulic and pneumatic symbols, schematic drawings, and piping diagrams. (Credit will not be awarded for both CAD 175 and DRF 175.) Lecture 2 hours per week.

CAD 201: Computer Aided Drafting and Design I (3 cr.) —Teaches computer-aided drafting concepts and equipment designed to develop a general understanding of components of a typical CAD system and its operation. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 2-3 hours. Laboratory 2-3 hours. Total 4-6 hours per week.

CAD 202: Computer Aided Drafting and Design II (3 cr.) — Teaches production drawings and advanced operations in computer aided drafting. Prerequisite: Completion of DRF 151 or CAD 151. Lecture 2-3 hours. Laboratory 2-3 hours. Total 4-6 hours per week.

Computer Science

CSC 201: Computer Science I (4 cr.) — Introduces algorithm and problem solving methods. Emphasizes structured programming concepts, elementary data structures and the study and use of a high level programming language. Co-requisite or Completion: CSC 100 or ITE 115 or equivalent and MTH 173 or equivalent or divisional approval. Lecture 4 hours per week.

CSC 202: Computer Science II (4 cr.) — Examines data structures and algorithm analysis. Covers data structures (including sets, strings, stacks, queues, arrays, records, files, linked lists, and trees), abstract data types, algorithm analysis (including searching and sorting methods), and file structures. Prerequisite: CSC 201. Co-requisite or Completion: MTH 174 or equivalent. Lecture 4 hours per week.

D


Dental Assisting

DNA 103: Introduction to Oral Health (1 cr.) — Teaches anatomy of the head and neck, the oral cavity hard and soft tissues, as well as tooth morphology.  Includes dental terminology, deciduous and permanent dentition as well as pathology.  Lecture 1 hour per week. Prerequisite: Acceptance into DNA program.

DNA 108: Dental Science (3 cr.) — Studies head and neck anatomy, tooth morphology, pathological conditions of the oral cavity, disease processes, and microbiology.  Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week. Prerequisite: Acceptance into DNA program.

DNA 110: Dental Materials (3 cr.) — Studies the materials utilized in the laboratory aspect of dentistry as support in treatment. Emphasis is placed on the characteristics, manipulation, economical control, storage, and delivery of materials.  Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week. Prerequisite: Acceptance into DNA program.

DNA 113: Chairside Assisting I (3 cr.) — Provides instruction on the principles of clinical chair side dental assisting, dental equipment use and maintenance, safety, instrument identification, tray set-ups by procedures, and patient data collection. Emphasis on patient management during restorative procedures.  Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week. Prerequisite: Acceptance into DNA program.

DNA 114: Chairside Assisting II (4 cr.) — Introduces the student to various dental specialties including oral surgery, orthodontics, periodontics, prosthodontics, endodontic, and pediatric dentistry. Integrates and applies previous course content to operative dental procedures. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Total 8 hours per week. Prerequisite: Completed DNA 113 and DNA 134. Co-requisite: DNA 190.

DNA 119: Dental Therapeutics (1 cr.) —Exposes students to concepts and terminology related to pharmacology, pain control, and dental medicinal agents.  Emphasis is placed on the use of materials I patient treatment. Lecture 1 hour per week. Prerequisite: Acceptance into DNA program.

DNA 120: Community Health (1 cr.) — Studies topics related to community health issues including identification of specific diseases, symptoms, causes, and effects.  An emphasis is placed on the promotion of oral health in the community through patient education in oral home care techniques, dietary counseling, plaque control procedures and application of medicinal agents. Lecture 1 hour per week. Prerequisite: Acceptance into DNA program.

DNA 130: Dental Office Management (2 cr.) — Exposes students to and provides practical experience in the legal aspects of dental office management with regard to ethics, jurisprudence, appointment control, recall systems, reception techniques, and telephone techniques. Accounts receivable and payable, payroll, insurance claims, inventory control, and professional conduct in a dental office.  Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Total 2 hours per week. Prerequisite: Acceptance into DNA program.

DNA 134: Dental Radiology and Practicum (3 cr.) — Teaches the physics of dental radiation and safety, equipment operation, cone placement for the parallel and bisection techniques, panoramic exposures, mounting and film processing.  Prerequisite: Admission to the Dental Assisting Program required. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week. Prerequisite: Acceptance into DNA program.

DNA 140: Externship (5 cr.) — Exposes students to the fast pace of a dental practice while they perform support services with an established team. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 12 hours. Total 13 hours per week. Prerequisite: DNA 114.

DNA 190: Coordinated Internship (3 cr.) — Supervises on-the-job training in selected business, industrial or service firms coordinated by the college. Credit/practice not to exceed 1:5 hours. May be repeated for credit. Variable hours. Prerequisite: DNA 113 and DNA 134. Co-requisite for DNA 114.

DNA 199: Supervised Study (1 cr.) — Assigns problems for independent study incorporating previous instruction and supervised by the instructor. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Program advisor approval. Variable hours.

DNA 210: Amalgam Restorations: Placing, Packing, Carving, and Polishing (3 cr.) — Studies the characteristics, manipulation, economical control, storage, and delivery or amalgam restorative materials. Covers the materials and techniques of direct amalgam placement, carving and finishing as support in dental treatment in a laboratory environment. 3 credits, 9 hours/ week, contact time = 135 hours.

DNH 212: Composite Resin Restorations: Placing and Shaping (4 cr.)
— Studies the characteristics, manipulation, economical control, storage, and delivery of composite restorative materials. Covers the materials and techniques of direct composite placement and finishing in a laboratory setting as supported in dental treatment. 4 credits, 12 hours/week, contact time = 180 hours.

DNA 214: Indirect Restoration Techniques (3 cr. ) — Studies the characteristics, manipulation, economical control, storage, and delivery of indirect restoration materials. Covers materials and techniques of non- epinephrine cord placement, taking of final impressions, and final cementation of indirect restorations in a laboratory setting as a support in treatment. Emphasis is placed on the 3 credits, 9 hour/week, contact time = 135 hours.

E


Economics

ECO 120: Survey of Economics (3 cr.) — Presents a broad overview of economic theory, history, development, and application. Introduces terms, definitions, policies, and philosophies of market economies. Provides some comparison with other economic systems. Includes some degree of exposure to microeconomic and macroeconomic concepts. Prerequisite: MTE 1-4 and ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 2-3 hours per week.

ECO 201: Principles of Macroeconomics (3 cr.) — Introduces macroeconomics including the study of Keynesian, classical, monetarist principles and theories, the study of national economic growth, inflation, recession, unemployment, financial markets, money and banking, the role of government spending and taxation, along with international trade and investments. Prerequisite: MTE 1-4 and ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ECO 202: Principles of Microeconomics (3 cr.) — Introduces the basic concepts of microeconomics. Explores the free market concept with coverage of economic models and graphs, scarcity and choices, supply and demand, elasticities, marginal benefits and costs, profits, and production and distribution. Prerequisite: MTE 1-4 and ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

Education

EDU 114: Driver Task Analysis (3 cr.) — Introduces the“driver task”as related to the highway transportation system and factors that influences performance ability. Prepares students so they may be eligible to take certification exams for driving school instructors in both public and private schools. Prerequisite: Placement into ENF 2 or ESL 41. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

EDU 200: Introduction to Teaching as a Profession (3 cr.) — Provides an orientation to the teaching profession in Virginia, including historical perspectives, current issues, and future trends in education on the national and state levels. Emphasizes information about teacher licensure examinations, steps to certification, teacher preparation and induction programs, and attention to critical shortage areas in Virginia. Includes supervised field placement (recommended: 40 clock hours) in a K-12 school. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible and successful completion of 24 credits of transfer courses. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

EDU 214: Instructional Principles of Driver Education (3 cr.) — Analyzes rules and regulations that govern the conduct of Driver Education programs with special emphasis on organization and administration. Includes uses in the classroom, driving range and on the street. Prepares students so they may be eligible to take the state certification exam in driver education. Prerequisite: Completed EDU 114. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

EDU 235: Health, Safety, and Nutrition Education (3 cr.) — Focuses on the health and developmental needs of children and the methods by which these needs are met. Emphasizes positive health, hygiene, nutrition and feeding routines, childhood diseases, and safety issues. Emphasizes supporting the mental and physical well being of children, as well as procedures for reporting child abuse. Lecture 3 hours per week.

Engineering

EGR 110: Engineering Graphics (3 cr.) — Presents theories and principles of orthographic projection. Studies multiview, pictorial drawings and sketches, geometric construction, sectioning, lettering, tolerancing, dimensioning and auxiliary projections. Studies the analysis and graphic presentation of space relationships of fundamental geometric elements; points, lines, planes and solids. Includes instruction in Computer Aided Drafting. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

EGR 120: Introduction to Engineering (2 cr.) — Introduces the engineering profession, professional concepts, ethics, and responsibility. Reviews hand calculators, number systems, and unit conversions. Introduces the personal computer and operating systems. Includes engineering problem solving techniques using computer software. Lecture 0-2 hours. Laboratory 0-3 hours. Co-requisite: MTH 162 or Prerequisite: Completed MTH 115 or MTH 167. Total 1-4 hours per week.

EGR 126: Computer Programming for Engineers (3 cr.) — Introduces computers, their architecture and software. Teaches program development using flowcharts. Solves engineering problems involving programming in languages such as FORTRAN, PASCAL, or C++. Lecture 2-3 hours. Laboratory 0-2 hours.  Prerequisite: MTH 173. Total 3-4 hours per week.

EGR 140: Engineering Mechanics – Statics (3 cr.) — Introduces mechanics of vector forces and space, scalar mass and time, including S.I. and U.S. customary units. Teaches equilibrium, free-body diagrams, moments, couples, distributed forces, centroids, moments of inertia analysis of two- force and multi-force members and friction and internal forces. Prerequisite: Completed PHY 241. Lecture 3 hours per week.

EGR 245: Engineering Mechanics – Dynamics (3 cr.) — Presents approach to kinematics of particles in linear and curvilinear motion. Includes kinematics of rigid bodies in plane motion. Teaches Newton’s second law, work-energy and power, impulse and momentum, and problem solving using computers. Prerequisite: EGR 140 and MTH 277. Lecture 3 hours per week.

EGR 246: Mechanics of Materials (3 cr.) — Teaches concepts of stress, strain, deformation, internal equilibrium, and basic properties of engineering materials. Analyzes axial loads, torsion, bending, shear and combined loading. Studies stress transformation and principle stresses, column analysis and energy principles. Prerequisite: Completed EGR 140. Lecture 3 hours per week.

EGR 248: Thermodynamics for Engineering (3 cr.) — Studies formulation of the first and second law of thermodynamics. Presents energy conversion, concepts of energy, and temperature, entropy, and enthalpy, equations of state of fluids. Covers reversibility and irreversibility in processes, closed and open systems, cyclical processes and problem solving using computers. Prerequisite: CHM 111 and EGR 140. Lecture 3 hours per week.

EGR 251: Basic Electric Circuits I (3 cr.) — Teaches fundamental of electric circuits. Includes circuit quantities of charge, current, potential, power and energy. Teaches resistive circuit analysis; Ohm’s and Kirchoff’s laws; nodal and mesh analysis; network theorems; RC, RL and RLC circuit transient response with constant forcing function. Teaches AC steady-state analysis, power, three- phase circuits, Presents frequency domain analysis, resonance, Fourier series, inductively coupled circuits, Laplace transform applications, and circuit transfer functions. Introduces problem solving using computers Part I of II. Corequisites: EGR 255, MTH 279 and PHY 242. Lecture 3 hours per week.

EGR 252: Basic Electric Circuits II (3 cr.) — Teaches fundamentals of electric circuits. Includes circuit quantities of charge, current, potential, power and energy. Teaches resistive circuit analysis; Ohm’s and Kirchoff’s laws; nodal and mesh analysis; network theorems; RC, RL and RLC circuit transient response with constant forcing functions. Teaches AC steady-state analysis, power, three- phase circuits. Presents frequency domain analysis, resonance, Fourier series, inductively coupled circuits, Laplace transform applications, and circuit transfer functions. Introduces problem solving using computers. Part II of II. Prerequisite: MTH 279 and EGR 251. Lecture 3 hours per week.

EGR 255: Electric Circuits Laboratory (1 cr.) — Teaches principles and operation of laboratory instruments such as VOM, electronic voltmeters, digital multimeters, oscilloscopes, counters, wave generators and power supplies. Presents application to circuit measurements, including transient and steady-state response of simple networks with laboratory applications of laws and theories of circuits plus measurement of AC quantities. Co-requisite: EGR 251. Laboratory 3 hours per week.

EGR 261: Signals and Systems (3 cr.) — Covers topics including Laplace transforms and Laplace transform analysis of circuits, time and frequency domain representation of linear systems, methods of linear systems analysis including convolution and Laplace transforms, frequency domain representation of signals including frequency response, filters, Fourier series, and Fourier transforms. Prerequisites: MTH 279 and EGR 251. Lecture 3 hours per week.

EGR 290: Coordinated Internship (1-5 cr.) – Supervises on-the-job training in selected business, industrial or service firms coordinated by the college. Additional requirement: Program advisor approval. Credit/practice ratio not to exceed 1:5 hours. May be repeated for credit. Variable hours. 1-5 credits.

EGR 295 – Topics In Engineering (3 cr.) – Introduces engineering students to engineering problem definition and conceptual design, mathematical modeling of physical systems, professional communication, and teamwork. Includes work with both Computer Aided Design and Drafting (CADD) tools and programming language(s) widely used in engineering, such as MATLAB. Prerequisite: Completed EGR 120 or equivalent with a grade of C or better, or permission of instructor. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

Electrical Technology

ELE 133: Practical Electricity I (3 cr.) — Teaches the fundamentals of electricity, terminology, symbols, and diagrams. Includes the principles essential to the understanding of general practices, safety and the practical aspects of residential and non-residential wiring and electrical installation, including fundamentals of motors and controls. Pre/Co-requisite MTE 6 or satisfactory score on an appropriate proficiency examination. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

ELE 156: Electrical Control Systems (3 cr.) — Includes troubleshooting and servicing electrical controls, electric motors, motor controls, motor starters, relays, overloads, instruments and control circuits. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

ELE 233: Programmable Logic Controller Systems I (3 cr.) — Teaches operating and programming of programmable logic controllers. Covers analog and digital interfacing and communication schemes as they apply to system. Prerequisite: ETR 156. Lecture 2-3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5-6 hours per week

English Fundamentals

ENF 1: Preparing for College Level English I (8 cr.) — Provides integrated reading and writing instruction for students who require extensive preparation to succeed in college-level English courses. Students will place into this course based on placement test score. Upon successful completion and faculty recommendation, students will move into Preparing for College English III (if they require additional preparation) or into college-level English (if they require no additional preparation). Credit is not applicable toward graduation. Prerequisite: Placed into ENF 1 and completion of SDV 100, 101, or 108 or co-enrollment of SDV 108. Lecture 8 hours per week.

ENF 2: Preparing for College Level English II (4 cr.) — Provides integrated reading and writing instruction for students who require intermediate preparation to succeed in college-level English courses. Students will place into this course based on placement test score. Upon successful completion and faculty recommendation, students will move into Preparing for College Level III (if they require additional preparation) or into college-level English (if they require no additional preparation). Credit is not applicable toward graduation. Prerequisite: Placed into ENF 2 and completion or co-enrollment of SDV 100, 101 or 108 Lecture 4 hours per week.

ENF 3: Preparing for College Level English III (2 cr.) — Provides integrated reading and writing instruction for students who require minimal preparation for college-level English but still need some preparation to succeed. Students in this course will be co-enrolled in college-level English. Students will place into this course based on placement test score. Credit is not applicable toward graduation. Prerequisite: Placed into ENF 3 and completion or co-enrollment of SDV 100, 101 or 108. Lecture 2 hours per week.

English

ENG 111: College Composition I (3 cr.) — Introduces students to critical thinking and the fundamentals of academic writing. Through the writing process, students refine topics: develop and support ideas; investigate, evaluate, and incorporate appropriate resources; edit for effective style and usage; and determine appropriate approaches for a variety of contexts, audiences, and purposes. Writing activities will include exposition and argumentation with at least one researched essay. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible.

ENG 112: College Composition II (3 cr.) — Continues to develop college writing with increased emphasis on critical essays, argumentation, and research, developing these competencies through the examination of a range of texts about the human experience. Requires students to locate, evaluate, integrate, and document sources and effectively edit for style and usage. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Students must successfully complete ENG 111 or its equivalent, and must be able to use word processing software.

ENG 115: Technical Writing (3 cr.) — Develops ability in technical writing through extensive practice in composing technical reports and other documents. Guides students in achieving voice, tone, style, and content in formatting, editing, and graphics. Introduces students to technical discourse through selected reading. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ENG 210: Advanced Composition (3 cr.) — Helps students refine skills in writing non-fiction prose. Guides development of individual voice and style. Introduces procedures for publication. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Completed ENG 112 or divisional approval.

ENG 211-212: Creative Writing I-II (3 cr.) — Introduces the student to the fundamentals of writing imaginatively. Students write in forms to be selected from poetry, fiction, drama, and essays. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Completed ENG 112 or divisional approval.

ENG 215-216: Creative Writing – Fiction I-II (3 cr.) — Introduces the fundamentals and techniques of writing short and long fiction. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ENG 217-218: Creative Writing – Poetry I-II (3 cr.) — Introduces the fundamentals and techniques of writing poetry. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ENG 233: The Bible as Literature (3 cr.) — Provides an introduction to the study of the Bible as literature. Examines the intent and presentation of major literary genres found in the Bible, refining skills of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Completed ENG 112 or divisional approval.

ENG 236: Introduction to the Short Story (3 cr.) — Examines selected short stories emphasizing the history of the genre. Involves critical reading and writing. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Completed ENG 112 or divisional approval.

ENG 241-242: Survey of American Literature I-II (3 cr.) — Examines American literary works from colonial times to the present, emphasizing the ideas and characteristics of our national literature. Involves critical reading and writing. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Completed ENG 112 or divisional approval. Need not be taken in sequence.

ENG 243-244: Survey of English Literature I-II (3 cr.) — Studies major English works from the Anglo-Saxons to the present, emphasizing ideas and characteristics of the British literary tradition. Involves critical reading and writing. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Completed ENG 112 or divisional approval. Need not be taken in sequence.

ENG 246: Major American Writers (3 cr.) — Examines major writers of American literary history. Involves critical reading and writing. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Completed ENG 112 or divisional approval.

ENG 247: Survey of Popular Culture (3 cr.) — Analyzes familiar aspects of American culture, as seen through popular literature, with additional emphasis on television, film, and popular art. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Completed ENG 112 or divisional approval.

ENG 251-252: Survey of World Literature I-II (3 cr.) — Examines major works of world literature. Involves critical reading and writing. Prerequisite: Completed ENG 112 or divisional approval. Lecture 3 hours per week. Need not be taken in sequence.

ENG 253: Survey of African-American Literature I-II (3 cr.) — Examines selected works by Black American writers from the colonial period to the present. Involves critical reading and writing. Prerequisite: Completed ENG 112 or divisional approval. Lecture: 3 hours per week.  Need not be taken in sequence.

ENG 255: Major Writers in World Literature (3 cr.) — Examines major writers selected from a variety of literary traditions. Involves critical reading and writing. Prerequisite: Completed ENG 112 or divisional approval. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ENG 273-274: Women in Literature I-II (3 cr.) — Examines literature by and about women. Involves critical reading and writing. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Completed ENG 112 or divisional approval. Need not be taken in sequence.

ENG 276: Southern Literature (3 cr.) — Examines the themes and techniques of selected writers dealing with the American South as a distinctive cultural entity. Involves critical reading and writing. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Completed ENG 112 or divisional approval.

ENG 279: Film and Literature (3 cr.) — Examines the transition of literature into film viewing and writing. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Completed ENG 112 or divisional approval.

Environmental Science

ENV 121: General Environmental Science I (4 cr.) — Explores fundamental components and interactions that make up the natural systems of the earth. Introduces the basic science concepts in the discipline of biological, chemical, and earth sciences that are necessary to understand and address environmental issues. Lecture 3 hours. Recitation and Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week. Part I of II.

ENV 122: General Environmental Science II (4 cr.) — Explores fundamental components and interactions that make up the natural systems of the earth. Introduces the basic science concepts in the disciplines of biological, chemical, and earth sciences that are necessary to understand and address environmental issues. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week. Part II of II.

ENV 136: Survey of Environmental Concerns (3 cr.) — Studies the relationship of man to his physical environment; ecological principles; public health; topics of current importance including air pollution, potable water, waste disposal, communicable disease, poisoning and toxicity, radiation, with particular emphasis on community action programs. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ENV 299: Supervised Study (1 cr.) — Capstone Presentation: Assigns a project for independent study incorporating previous instruction and supervised by the instructor and supervised by the instructor. Co-requisite: ENV 122 or a 200 level science course.

English As A Second Language

ESL 31: English as a Second Language I: Composition I (3 cr.) — Provides instruction and practice in the writing process, emphasizing development of fluency in writing and competence in structural and grammatical patterns of written English. Co-requisite: ESL 32 or ESL 05. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ESL 32: English as a Second Language: Reading I (3 cr.) — Helps students improve their reading comprehension and vocabulary development. Improves students reading proficiency to a level, which would allow the students to function adequately in ESL 42 and other college classes. Co-requisite: ESL 31 or ESL 11. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ESL 33: Oral Communication I (3 cr.) — Helps students practice and improve listening and speaking skills as needed for functioning successfully in academic, professional, and personal settings. Assesses students oral skills and includes, as needed, practice with pronunciation, rhythm, stress, and intonation. Provides exercises, practices, small and large group activities, and oral presentations to help students overcome problems in oral communication. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ESL 41: English as a Second Language: Composition II (3 cr.) — Provides further instruction and practice in the writing process and introduces advanced language patterns. Includes practice in developing and improving writing strategies. Co-requisite: ESL 42 or ESL 6. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ESL 42: English as a Second Language: Reading II (3 cr.) — Improves students reading proficiency to a level which would allow students to function adequately in the ESL reading class and other college classes. Co-requisite: ESL 41 or ESL 12. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ESL 72: English as a Second Language: Spelling and Vocabulary
(3 cr.) — Provides individualized instruction and practice in sound-letter correspondences. Introduces students to basic spelling rules, word division, prefixes, roots and suffixes. Helps students master vocabulary through an understanding of homonyms, confusing words, and Greek and Latin roots. Stresses using words in context. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ESL 73: Accent Reduction (3 cr.) — Provides contextualized practice at the high intermediate/advanced level to improve the speech and intelligibility of non-native speakers of English. Focuses on problems of American English pronunciation, unclear individual sounds and positional variants, stress, rhythm and intonation common to speakers of different language backgrounds. May include individualized practice in consonant and vowel production. Lecture 3 hours per week.

Electronics Technology

ETR 141: Electronics I (3 cr.) — Introduces electronic devices as applied to basic electronic circuits and systems. Part I of II. Lecture 3 hours per week.

F


Financial Services

FIN 107: Personal Finance (3 cr.) — Presents a framework of personal money management concepts, including establishing values and goals, determining sources of income, managing income, preparing a budget, developing consumer buying ability, using credit, understanding savings and insurance, providing for adequate retirement, and estate planning. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

FIN 166: Credit Analysis (3 cr.) — Uses ratios and other measures to interpret and analyze financial statements. Emphasizes comparative statement analysis and examines organizational structure necessary for effective collection results. Focuses on policies and procedures necessary to handle collection correspondence. Covers such other topics as legal aids, use of adjustment bureaus, bankruptcy, and insurance. Examines credit practices and policies of banks and finance companies. Introduces foreign credit and collection procedures. Lecture 3 hours per week.

FIN 215: Financial Management (3 cr.) — Introduces basic financial management topics including statement analysis, working capital, capital budgeting, and long-term financing. Focuses on Net Present Value and Internal Rate of Return techniques, lease vs. buy analysis, and cost of capital computations. Uses problems and cases to enhance skills in financial planning and decision making. Prerequisite: BUS 122 and ENG 111 eligible or approval by the Dean of Instruction. Lecture 3 hours per week.

Fire Services

FST 100: Principles of Emergency Services (3 cr.) — Provides an overview to fire protection; career opportunities in fire protection and related fields; philosophy and history of fire protection/service; fire loss analysis; organization and function to public and private fire protection services; fire departments as part of local government; laws and regulations affecting the fire service; fire service nomenclature; specific fire protection functions; basic fire chemistry and physics; introduction to fire protection systems; introduction to fire strategy and tactics. Lecture 3 hours per week.

FST 110: Fire Behavior and Combustion (3 cr.) — Explores the theories and fundamentals of how and why fires start, spread, and how they are controlled. Lecture 3 hours per week.

FST 112: Hazardous Materials Chemistry (3 cr.) — Provides basic fire chemistry relating to the categories of hazardous materials including problems of recognition, reactivity, and health encountered by firefighters. Lecture 3 hours per week.

FST 115: Fire Prevention (3 cr.) — Provides fundamental information regarding the history and philosophy of fire prevention, organization and operation of a fire prevention bureau, use of fire codes, identification and correction of fire hazards, and the relationships of fire prevention with built-in fire protection systems, fire investigation, and fire and life-safety education. Lecture 3 hours per week.

FST 121: Principles of Fire and Emergency Services Safety and Survival (3 cr.) — Introduces basic principles and history related to the national firefighter life safety initiatives, focusing on the need for cultural and behavior change throughout the emergency services. Lecture 3 hours per week.

FST 135: Fire Instructor I (3 cr.) – Emphasizes development of teaching methods and aids, including role-playing, small group discussion and development of individual learning methods and materials. Requires students to develop lesson plans and make presentations on appropriate topics. Based on current requirements of NFPA 1041, Standards for Fire Instructor Professional Qualifications, and prepares student for certifications as Fire Instructor I.  Lecture 3 hours per week.

FST 140: Fire Officer I (3 cr.) – Presents a basic course to help individuals develop the skills needed to supervise and direct personnel, and manage resources at the company level; and is based on the current requirements of the NFPA 1021, Standards for Fire Officer Professional Qualifications. Prepares student for certification as Fire Office I. Lecture 3 hours per week.

FST 205: Fire Protection Hydraulics and Water Supply (3 cr.) — Provides a foundation of theoretical knowledge in order to understand the principles of the use of water in fire protection and to apply hydraulic principles to analyze and to solve water supply problems. Lecture 3 hours per week.

FST 210: Legal Aspects of Fire Service (3 cr.) — Introduces the Federal, State, and local laws that regulate emergency services, national standards influencing emergency services, standard of care, tort, liability, and a review of relevant court cases. Lecture 3 hours per week.

FST 215: Fire Protection Systems (3 cr.) — Provides information relating to the features of design and operation of fire detection and alarm systems, heat and smoke control systems, special protection and sprinkler systems, water supply for fire protection and portable fire extinguishers. Lecture 3 hours per week.

FST 220: Building Construction for Fire Protection (3 cr.) — Provides the components of building construction that relate to fire and life safety. Focuses on firefighter safety. Covers the elements of construction and design of structures and how they are key factors when inspecting buildings, preplanning fire operations, and operating at emergencies. Lecture 3 hours per week.

FST 235: Strategy and Tactics (3 cr.) — Provides an in-depth analysis of the principles of fire control through utilization of personnel, equipment, and extinguishing agents on the fire ground. Lecture 3 hours per week.

FST 237: Emergency Service Supervision (3 cr.) — Teaches the history of modern management theories, including scientific management and behavioral scientist approach. Introduces concepts of group dynamics, leadership, communication, stress and time management, and personnel evaluation techniques. Discuss the legal and ethical considerations of personnel management in the emergency service. Lecture 3 hours per week.

FST 240: Fire Administration (3 cr.) — Introduces the student to the organization and management of a fire department and the relationship of government agencies to the first service. Emphasis on fire service leadership from the perspective of the company officer. Lecture 3 hours per week.

FST 245: Fire and Risk Analysis (3 cr.) — Presents a study of current urban fire problems with emphasis on solutions based upon current available technology. Includes master planning, as well as methods of identifying, analyzing and measuring accompanying risk and loss possibilities. Prerequisite: FST 240. Lecture 3 hours per week.

FST 250: Fire Officer II (3 cr.) — Presents an intermediate-level course  to help individuals further develop the skills needed to supervise and direct personnel, manage resources at the company level; and is based on the current requirements of the NFPA 1021, Standards for Fire Officer Professional Qualifications. Prepares student for certification as Fire Officer II. Prerequisite: FST 140 or Certification as Fire Officer I. Lecture for 3 hours per week.

French

FRE 101: Beginning French I (4 cr.) — Introduces understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills and emphasizes basic French sentence structure. Part I of II. Lecture 4 hours per week. May include one additional hour of oral practice per week.  Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible.

FRE 102: Beginning French II (4 cr.) — Introduces understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills and emphasizes basic French sentence structure. Part II of II. Lecture 4 hours per week. May include one additional hour of oral practice per week. Prerequisite: Completed FRE 101 or minimum placement recommendation for FRE 102.

FRE 201: Intermediate French I (3 cr.) — Continues to develop understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills. French is used in the classroom. Prerequisite: Completed FRE 102 or equivalent or minimum placement recommendation for FRE 201. Part I of II. Lecture 3 hours per week. May include one additional hour of oral practice per week.

FRE 202: Intermediate French II (3 cr.) — Continues to develop understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills. French is used in the classroom. Prerequisite: Completed FRE 201 or equivalent or minimum placement recommendation for FRE 202. Part II of II. Lecture 3 hours per week. May include one additional hour of oral practice per week.

G


Geography

GEO 200: Introduction to Physical Geography (3 cr.) — Studies major elements of the natural environment including earth sun relationship, land forms, weather and climate, natural vegetation and soils. Introduces the student to types and uses of maps. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

GEO 210: People and the Land: Introduction to Cultural Geography (3 cr.) — Focuses on the relationship between culture and geography. Presents a survey of modern demographics, landscape modification, material and nonmaterial culture, language, race and ethnicity, religion, politics, and economic activities. Introduces the student to types and uses of maps. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

GEO 220: World Regional Geography (3 cr.) — Studies physical and cultural characteristics of selected geographical regions of the world. Focuses upon significant problems within each of the regions, and examines the geographical background of those problems. Introduces the student to types and uses of maps. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

German

GER 101: Beginning German I (5 cr.) — Introduces understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills and emphasizes basic German sentence structures. Part I of II. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 5 hours per week. May include one additional hour oral practice per week.

GER 102: Beginning German II (5 cr.) — Introduces understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills and emphasizes basic German sentence structures. Part II of II. Prerequisite: Completed GER 101. Lecture 5 hours per week. May include one additional hour oral practice per week.

GER 201: Intermediate German I (3 cr.) — Continues to develop understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills. German is used in the classroom. Prerequisite: Completed GER 102 or equivalent. Part I of II. Lecture 3 hours per week. May include one additional hour oral practice per week.

GER 202: Intermediate German II (3 cr.) — Continues to develop understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills. German is used in the classroom. Prerequisite: Completed GER 201 or equivalent. Part II of II. Lecture 3 hours per week. May include one additional hour oral practice per week.

Geographical Information Systems

GIS 200: Geographical Information Systems I (3-4 cr.) — Provides hands on introduction to a dynamic desktop GIS (Geographic Information System). Introduces the components of a desktop GIS and their functionality. Emphasizes manipulation of data for the purpose of analysis, presentation, and decision making. 2-3 lecture hours and 2 laboratory hours (3-4 credits). Prerequisite: ITE 115 or equivalent or permission of the instructor.

GIS 201: Geographical Information Systems II (3-4 cr.) — Provides a continuation of GIS 200, with emphasis on advanced topics in problem solving, decision-making, modeling, programming, and data management. Covers map projections and data formats, and methods for solving the problems they create. 2-3 lecture hours and 2 laboratory hours (3-4 credits).Prerequisite: GIS 200.

Geology

GOL 105: Physical Geology (4 cr.) — Introduces the composition and structure of the earth and modifying agents and processes. Investigates the formation of minerals and rocks, weathering, erosion, earthquakes, and crustal deformation. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

GOL 106: Historical Geology (4 cr.) — Traces the evolution of the earth and life through time. Presents scientific theories of the origin of the earth and life and interprets rock and fossil records. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

GOL 299: Supervised Study (1 cr.) – Capstone Presentation: Assigns a project for independent study incorporating previous instruction and supervised by the instructor. Corequisite: a 200 level science course.

H


Health

HLT 100: First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (3 cr.) — Focuses on the principles and techniques of safety, first aid, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation.  Co-enroll: ENF 2 or ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week. 2-3 credits ENF 2 eligible.

HLT 105: Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (1 cr.) — Provides training in coordinated mouth-to-mouth artificial ventilation and chest compression, choking, life-threatening emergencies, and sudden illness. Equivalent to EMS 100. Prerequisite: ENF2 eligible. Lecture 1 hour per week.

HLT 106: First Aid and Safety (2 cr.) — Focuses on the principles and techniques of safety and first aid. Lecture 2 hours per week. Prerequisite: ENF2 eligible.

HLT 110: Concepts of Personal and Community Health (3 cr.) — Studies the concepts related to the maintenance of health, safety, and the prevention of illness at the personal and community level. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HLT 116: Introduction to Personal Wellness Concepts (3 cr.) — Introduces students to the dimensions of wellness including the physical, emotional, environmental, spiritual, occupational, and social components. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HLT 135: Child Health and Nutrition (3 cr.) — Focuses on the physical needs of the preschool child and the methods by which these are met. Emphasizes health routines, hygiene, nutrition, feeding and clothing habits, childhood diseases, and safety as related to health growth and development. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HLT 143: Medical Terminology I (3 cr.) — Provides an understanding of medical abbreviations and terms. Includes the study of prefixes, suffixes, word stems, and technical terms with emphasis on proper spelling, pronunciation, and usage. Emphasizes more complex skills and techniques in understanding medical terminology. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HLT 190: Coordinated Internship (3 cr.) — Supervised on the job training in selected business, industrial or service firms coordinated by the college. Credit/ practice ratio not to exceed 1:5 hours. May be repeated for credit.

HLT 200: Human Sexuality (3 cr.) — Provides a basic understanding of human sexuality. Includes anatomy, physiology, pregnancy, family planning, venereal diseases, and sexual variations. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HLT 204: Women’s Health (3 cr.) — Explores current issues related to women’s health and wellness with an emphasis upon prevention of disease and optimum well-being. Takes a multi-ethnic approach to exploring the most up-to-date findings, diagnostic tools, and treatments for breast cancer, reproductive tract illness, heart, and other common diseases faced by women from puberty through menopause. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HLT 208: Fitness and Exercise Training (3 cr.) — Introduces techniques for conducting physical fitness assessments and includes an introduction to electrocardiography.  Emphasizes tests of Cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular strength and endurance, joint flexibility, body composition, and pulmonary capacity. Emphasizes the safety guidelines and precautions used in testing. Covers equipment use and maintenance. Prerequisite: HLT 100. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 4-5 hours per week.

HLT 230: Principles of Nutrition and Human Development (3 cr.)
— Teaches the relationship between nutrition and human development. Emphasizes nutrients, balanced diet, weight control, and the nutritional needs of an individual. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HLT 241: Perspectives in Global Health (3 cr.) — Examines global health issues and prevention efforts. Analyzes the complex relationship between economics, environment, culture and values in resolving health disparities. Discussion topics include infectious diseases, malnutrition, maternal/child/newborn health, chronic diseases, and emerging infections. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HLT 250: General Pharmacology (3 cr.) — Emphasizes general pharmacology for the health related professions covering general principles of drug actions/reactions, major drug classes, specific agent within each class, and routine mathematical calculations needed to determine desired dosages. Prerequisite: Completion of NUR 112 or an LPN certification. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HLT 261: Basic Pharmacy I (3 cr.) — Explores the basics of general pharmacy, reading prescriptions, symbols, packages, pharmacy calculations. Teaches measuring compounds of drugs, dosage forms, drug laws, and drug classifications. Prerequisite: Admission to the Pharmacy Technician Program. Co-requisite: HLT 250 and HLT 262 and HLT 263. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HLT 262: Basic Pharmacy II (3 cr.) — Explores the basics of general pharmacy, reading prescriptions, symbols, packages, pharmacy calculations. Teaches measuring compounds of drugs, dosage forms, drug laws, and drug classifications. Prerequisite: Admission into the Pharmacy Technician Program. Co-requisite: HLT 250 and HLT 261 and HLT 263. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HLT 263: Basic Pharmacy I Lab (1 cr.) — Provides practical experience to supplement instruction in HLT 261. Should be taken concurrently with HLT 261, in appropriate curricula, as identified by the college. Prerequisite: Admission into the Pharmacy Technician Program. Co-requisite: HLT 250 and HLT 261 and HLT 262. Laboratory 3 hours per week.

HLT 270: Health and Well-Being of the Older Adult (3 cr.) — Focuses on the health of the older adult; teaches health promotion; preventative health techniques; and accident prevention. Prerequisite: Admission to the Program. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HLT 290: Coordinated Internship (4 cr.) — Supervises on-the-job training in selected business, industrial or service firms coordinated by the college. Credit/practice ratio not to exceed 1:5 hours. May be repeated for credit.

Health Care Technician (Nurse Aide)

HCT 101: Health Care Technician I (4 cr.) — Teaches basic care skills with emphasis on physical, social, emotional, and spiritual needs of patients. Covers procedures, communications and interpersonal relations; observation, charting and reporting; care planning, safety and infection control; anatomy and physiology, nutrition and patient feeding; ethics, death and dying. Prepares multi-skilled health care workers to care for patients of various ages with special emphasis on geriatric nursing, home health, long and short term care facilities. Lecture 8 hours per week for eight weeks. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible and completion of MTE 1-2 or satisfactory completion on an appropriate proficiency examination.  *MTE 1-4 is preferred if student desires progression in nursing programs. High school graduation or GED required. Co-requisite: HCT 102.

HCT 102: Health Care Technician II (3 cr.) — Applies theory through laboratory experience for healthcare technicians to work in home health, long and short term facilities. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible and completion of MTE 1-2. High school graduation or GED required. Co-requisite: HCT 101. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

HCT 115: Medication Administration Training (3 cr.) — Prepares students to safely administer, or to assist in client self administration of medications in specific settings. Includes practice. Meets curriculum requirements of the State Board of Nursing. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

HCT 119: Advanced Health Care Technician (4 cr.) — Applies advanced theory through practical experience for healthcare technicians in home health, long and short term health care facilities. Teaches care of clients with emphasis on charting infection control, activities, nutrition, speech and physical therapy. Prerequisite: HCT 102 or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

History

HIS 101-102: History of Western Civilization I-II (3 cr.) — Examines the development of western civilization from ancient times to the present. Lecture 3 hours per week. Need not be taken in sequence. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible.

HIS 111-112: History of World Civilization I-II (3 cr.) —Surveys Asian, African, Latin American, and European civilizations from the ancient period to the present. Lecture 3 hours per week. Need not be taken in sequence. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible.

HIS 121-122: United States History I-II (3 cr.) — Surveys United States history from its beginning to the present. Lecture 3 hours per week. Need not be taken in sequence. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible.

HIS 155: Life in Colonial Virginia (3 cr.) — Studies life in Virginia before the American Revolution, including politics, economics, customs, culture, and the slave plantation system. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible.

HIS 203: History of African Civilization I (3 cr.) – Examines major social, economic, political and religious developments from earliest times to the present.  Part I of II. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HIS 204: History of African Civilizations II (3 cr.) – Examines major social, economic, political and religious developments from earliest times to the present. Part II of II. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HIS 211: History of England (3 cr.) — Surveys the history of the British Isles from pre-Celtic times to the present. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible.

HIS 225: Topics in European History I (3 cr.) — Examines selected topics in the history of Europe from ancient times to the present. Part I of II. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible.

HIS 226: Topics in European History II (3 cr.) – Examines selected topics in the history of Europe from ancient times to the present. Part II of II.  Lecture 3 hours per week.

HIS 253: History of Asian Civilizations I (3 cr.) – Surveys the civilizations of Asia from their origins to the present. Part I of II.  Lecture 3 hours per week.

HIS 254: History of Asian Civilizations II (3 cr.) – Surveys the civilizations of Asia from their origins to the present. Part II of II.  Lecture 3 hours per week.

HIS 262: United States History in Film (3 cr.) — Examines selected topics in the United States history which shaped the American experience, presented in film. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible.

HIS 266: Military History of the Civil War (3 cr.) — Analyzes military campaigns of the Civil War, including factors contributing to the defeat of the Confederacy and problems created by the war. May include field trips to Civil War sites in the region. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible.

HIS 267: The Second World War (3 cr.) – Examines causes and consequences of the Second World War. Includes the rise of totalitarianism, American neutrality, military developments, the home fronts, diplomacy, and the decision to use the atomic bomb. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HIS 268: The American Constitution (3 cr.) — Analyzes the origin and development of the United States Constitution. Includes the evolution of civil liberties, property rights, contracts, due process, judicial review, federal-state relationships, and corporate government relations. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible.

HIS 269: Civil War and Reconstruction (3 cr.) — Studies factors that led to the division between the states. Examines the war, the home fronts, and the era of Reconstruction. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible.

HIS 276: United States History since World War II (3 cr.) — Investigates United States history from 1945 to the present, studying both domestic developments and American involvement in international affairs. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible.

HIS 277: The American Experience in Vietnam (3 cr.) – Analyzes American involvement in Vietnam from World War II with emphasis on the presidencies of Johnson, Nixon and Ford.  Lecture 3 hours per week.

Humanities

HUM 100: Survey of the Humanities (3 cr.) — Introduces the humanities through the art, literature, music, & philosophy of various cultures & historical periods. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HUM 111-112: Great Books I-II (3 cr.) — Introduces selected great works of philosophy and literature, with emphasis on close analysis of the text. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HUM 165: Controversial Issues in Contemporary American Culture (3 cr.) — Introduces students to selected issues in contemporary American culture. Includes topic areas ranging from welfare reform, economic development, privacy, environmental protection and conservation, evolution vs. creation, to family values, and special interest lobbying in our state and national governments. Focuses on the development of the student’s critical thinking skills by analyzing, evaluating, and reflecting on opposing sides of the same issue as expressed by public leaders, special interest groups and academicians. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HUM 201: Survey of Western Culture I (3 cr.) — Studies thought, values, and arts of Western culture, integrating major developments in art, architecture, literature, music, and philosophy. Covers the following periods: Ancient and Classical, Early Christian and Byzantine, Medieval, and Early Renaissance. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HUM 202: Survey of Western Culture II (3 cr.) — Studies thought, values, and arts of Western culture, integrating major developments in art, architecture, literature, music, and philosophy. Covers the following periods: Renaissance, Baroque, Enlightenment, Romantic, and Modern. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HUM 210: Introduction to Women in Humanities (3 cr.) — Introduces interdisciplinary, cross-cultural and historical perspectives on the influence of women as evidenced in art, literature, religion, philosophy and music. Prerequisite: ENG 112. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HUM 211-212: Survey of American Culture I-II (3 cr.) — Examines elements of our national culture as they evolved from the first European explorations through colonization and independence to the present day. Lecture 3 hours per week. Need not be taken in sequence.

HUM 220: Introduction to African-American Studies (3 cr.) — Presents an interdisciplinary approach to the study of African- American life, history, and culture. Examines specific events, ideologies, and individuals that have shaped the contours of African- American life. Studies the history, sociology, economics, religion, politics, psychology, creative productions, and culture of African- Americans. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HUM 241-242: Interdisciplinary Principles of the Humanities I-II (3 cr.) — Integrates unifying principles of the humanities and related fields of study. Emphasizes the expansion of the student’s intellectual perspective and development of concepts enabling the integration of knowledge from diverse fields into a unified whole. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HUM 256: Mythology in Literature and the Arts (3 cr.) — Studies cultural expressions of mythology in literature and the arts. Considers several of the following mythologies, with emphasis on parallels and divergences: Egyptian, Near- Eastern, Greek, Roman, Celtic, Norse, Asian, and African. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HUM 259: Greek Mythology (3 cr.) — Surveys and analyzes major stories from Greek Mythology. Explores psychological, anthropological, and historical interpretations of the myths. Acquaints students with recurring mythological themes in language, art, music, and literature. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HUM 260: Survey of Twentieth-Century Culture (3 cr.) — Explores literature, visual arts, philosophy, music, and history of our time from an interdisciplinary perspective. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

I


Italian

ITA 101: Beginning Italian I (4 cr.) — Develops the understanding, speaking, reading, and writing of Italian, and emphasizes the structure of the language. Part I of II. Lecture 4 hours per week. May include one additional hour of oral practice per week.

ITA 102: Beginning Italian II (4 cr.) — Develops the understanding, speaking, reading, and writing of Italian, and emphasizes the structure of the language. Part II of II. Lecture 4 hours per week.  May include one additional hour of oral practice per week.

ITA 201: Intermediate Italian I (3 cr.) — Continues development of skills of understanding, speaking, reading and writing of Italian. Classes conducted in Italian. Prerequisite: ITA 102 or equivalent. Part I of II. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ITA 202: Intermediate Italian I (3 cr.) — Continues development of skills of understanding, speaking, reading and writing of Italian. Classes conducted in Italian. Part II of II. Prerequisite Completed ITA 102. Lecture 3 hours per week.

Industrial Engineering Technology

IND 101: Quality Assurance Technology I (3 cr.) — Studies principles and techniques of quality engineering for the management, design engineering economics, production, and assurance of quality. Emphasizes fundamentals of total quality assurance for product and process control. May include design review, fundamentals of statistics procurement control, sampling and control chart systems, quality reporting, process capability analysis, tool and gauge control, document control, or troubleshooting quality control. Lecture 3 hours per week.

IND 137: Team Concepts and Problem Solving (3 cr.) — Studies team concepts and problem solving techniques to assist project teams in improving quality and productivity. Provides knowledge of how to work as a team, plan and conduct good meetings, manage logistics and details, gather useful data, communicate the results and implement changes. Lecture 3 hours per week

IST: Information Technology and Databases

ITD 110: Web Page Design I (3 cr.) — Stresses a working knowledge of web site designs, construction, and management using HTML or XHTML. Includes headings, lists, links, images, image maps, tables, forms, and frames. Prerequisite: ITE 115 recommended. Lecture 3-4 hours. Laboratory 0-2 hours. Total 3-5 hours per week.

ITD 130: Database Fundamentals (3 cr.) — Introduces the student to Relational Database and Relational Database theory. Includes planning, defining and using a database; table design, linking, and normalization; types of databases, database description and definition. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible and ITE 115 recommended. Lecture 3- 4 hours. Laboratory 0-2 hours. Total 3-5 hours per week.

ITD 136: Database Management Software (3 cr.) — Covers an introduction to relational database theory and how to administer and query databases using multiple commercial database systems. Prerequisite: ITE 115 recommended. Lecture 3-4 hours. Laboratory 0-2 hours. Total 3-5 hours per week.

ITD 210: Web Page Design II (3 cr.) — Incorporates advanced techniques in web site planning, design, usability, accessibility, advanced site management, and maintenance utilizing web editor software(s). Prerequisite: Completed ITD 110 or IST 129. Lecture 3-4 hours. Laboratory 0-2 hours. Total 3-5 hours per week.

ITD 220: E-commerce Administration (3 cr.) — Emphasizes techniques to plan and design a platform-independent commerce Web site. Focuses on web business strategies, and the hardware and software tools necessary for Internet commerce, including comparison and selection of commerce architecture, installation and configuration, security considerations, and planning of a complete business-to-consumer and business-to-business site. Prerequisite: ITD 110 recommended. Lecture 3 hours per week.

Information Technology Essential

ITE 100: Introduction to Information Systems (3 cr.) — Covers the fundamentals of computers and computing and topics which include impact of computers on society, ethical issues, and terminology. Provides discussion about available hardware and software as well as their application. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ITE 115: Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts (3 cr.) — Covers computer concepts and internet skills and uses a software suite which includes word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentation software  to demonstrate skills required for computer literacy. Prerequisite: Keyboarding skills recommended. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ITE 160: Introduction to e-Commerce (3 cr.) — Studies the culture and demographics of the Internet, on-line business strategies and the hardware and software tools necessary for Internet commerce. Includes the identification of appropriate target segments, the development of product opportunities, pricing structures, distribution channels over the Internet, and the execution of marketing strategy in computer- mediated environments. Presents case histories of successful Web applications. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ITE 180: Help Desk Support Skills (3 cr.) — Emphasizes instruction in customer support techniques required for analyzing and coordinating software and hardware solutions for end-user needs. Includes evaluation and communication techniques required to provide help desk support necessary to transfer knowledge and enable implementation of a solution. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ITE 221: PC Hardware and OS Architecture (3 cr.) — Covers instruction about processors, internal functions, peripheral devices, computer organization, memory management, architecture, instruction format, and basic OS architecture. Lecture 3 hours per week.

Information Technology Networking

ITN 100: Introduction to Telecommunications (3 cr.) — Surveys data transmission systems, communication lines, data sets, network, modes of transmission, protocols, and interfacing. Emphasizes network structure and operation.  Lecture 3 hours per week.

ITN 101: Introduction to Network Concepts (3 cr.) — Provides instruction in networking media, physical and logical topologies, common networking standards and popular networking protocols. Emphasizes the TCP/IP protocol suite and related IP addressing schemes, including CIDR. Includes selected topics in network implementation, support and LAN/WAN connectivity. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ITN 106: Microcomputer Operating Systems (3 cr.) — Teaches use of operating system utilities and multiple- level directory structures, creation of batch files, and configuration of microcomputer environments. May include a study of graphical user interfaces. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ITN 107: Personal Computer Hardware and Troubleshooting (3 cr.) — Includes specially designed instruction to give a student a basic knowledge of hardware and software configurations. Includes the installation of various peripheral devices as well as a basic system hardware components. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ITN 124: Wireless Network Administration (WNA) (3 cr.) — Incorporates instruction in the fundamentals of radio frequency and spread spectrum technology and wireless networking systems implementation and design. Includes radio frequency and spread spectrum concepts, 802.11 standards and regulations, wireless network architecture, topology, software, equipment, OSI Model, site surveys, security features, and the design and implementation of wireless network solutions. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ITN 154: Networking Fundamentals – Router Basics – Cisco (4 cr.) — Provides instruction in the fundamentals of networking environments, the basics of router operations, and basic router configurations. Lecture 2-3 hours per week. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4-5 hours per week.

ITN 155: Switching, Wireless, and WAN Technologies (ICND2) – Cisco (4 cr.) — Provides the skills and knowledge to install, operate, and troubleshoot a small-to-medium sized branch office enterprise network, including configuring several switches and routers, configuring wireless devices, configuring VLANS, connecting to a WAN, and implementing network security. Prerequisite: ITN 154.     Lecture 4 hours per week.

ITN 156: Basic Switching and Routing – Cisco (4 cr.) — Centers instruction in LAN segmentation using bridges, routers, and switches. Includes fast Ethernet, access lists, routing protocols, spanning tree protocol, virtual LANS and network management. Prerequisite: Completed ITN 155. Lecture 4 hours per week.

ITN 157: WAN Technologies – Cisco (4 cr.) — Concentrates on an introduction to Wide Area Networking (WANs). Includes WAN design, LAPB, Frame Relay, ISDN, HDLC, and PPP. Prerequisite: Completed ITN 156. Lecture 4 hours per week.

ITN 170: Linux System Administration (3 cr.) — Focuses instruction on the installation, configuration and administration of the Linux operating system and emphasizes the use of Linux as a network client and workstation. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ITN 171: Unix 1 (3 cr.) — Provides an introduction to UNIX operating systems. Teaches login procedures, file creation, UNIX file structure, input/output control, and the UNIX shell. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ITN 200: Administration of Network Resources (3 cr.) — Focuses on the management of local area network servers. Teaches proper structuring of security systems. Explains print queues, disk management, and other local area network (LAN) issues. Presents concerns and issues for the purchase and installation of hardware and software upgrades. Can be taught using any network operating system or a range of operating systems as a delivery tool. Lecture 4 hours per week.

ITN 208: Protocols and Communications-TCP/IP (4 cr.) — Provides an understanding of the TCP/IP suite and the details of its implementation. Discusses details of implementation such as IP addressing, the structure of frames and protocol headers that enable communication between two computers. Discusses IP routing, tunneling, SNMP, and security. Lecture 4 hours per week.

ITN 260: Network Security Basics (3 cr.) — Provides instruction in the basics of network security in depth. Includes security objectives, security architecture, security models and security layers; risk management, network security policy, and security training. Includes the five security keys: confidentiality, integrity, availability, accountability, and auditability. Lecture 3-4 hours. Laboratory 0-2 hours. Total 3-5 hours per week.

ITN 261: Network Attacks, Computer Crimes and Hacking (4 cr.) — Encompasses in-depth exploration of various methods for attacking and defending a network. Explores network security concepts from the viewpoint of hackers and their attack methodologies. Includes topics about hackers, attacks, Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS), malicious code, computer crime and industrial espionage. Prerequisite: Completed ITN 260. Lecture 4 hours per week.

ITN 262 – Network Communication, Security and Authentication (4cr.) – Covers an in-depth exploration of various communication protocols with a concentration on TCP/IP. Explores communication protocols from the point of view of the hacker in order to highlight protocol weaknesses. Includes Internet architecture, routing, addressing, topology, fragmentation and protocol analysis, and the use of various utilities to explore TCP/IP. Lecture 4 hours per week.

ITN 263: Internet/Intranet Firewalls and E Commerce Security (4 cr.)
— Gives an in-depth exploration of firewalls, Web security, and e-commerce security. Explores firewall concepts, types, topology and the firewall’s relationship to the TCP/IP protocol. Includes client/server architecture, the Web server, HTML, and HTTP in relation to Web security, and digital certification D.509, and public key infrastructure (PKI). Prerequisite: Completed ITN 260. Lecture 4 hours per week.

ITN 266: Network Security Layers (3 cr.) — Provides an in-depth exploration of various security layers needed to protect the network. Explores Network Security from the viewpoint of the environment in which the network operates and the necessity to secure that environment to lower the security risk to the network. Includes physical security, personnel security, operating system security, software security and database security. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ITN 267: Legal Topics in Network Security (3 cr.) — Conveys an in-depth exploration of the civil and common law issues that apply to network security. Explores statutes, jurisdictional, and constitutional issues related to computer crimes and privacy. Includes rules of evidence, seizure and evidence handling, court presentation and computer privacy in the digital age. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ITN 276: Computer Forensics I (4 cr.) — Teaches computer forensic investigation techniques for collecting computer-related evidence at the physical layer from a variety of digital media (hard drives, compact flash and PDAs) and performing analysis at the file system layer. Prerequisite: ITN 106, ITN 107.  Co-requisite: ITN 260. Credit will be given to ITN 275 or ITN 276 and ITN 277, but not all three courses. Lecture 4 hours per week.

ITN 277:  Computer Forensics II (4 cr.) — Develops skills in the forensic extraction of computer evidence at a logical level using a variety of operating systems and applications (i.e., e-mail) and learn techniques for recovering data from virtual memory, temporary Internet files, and intentionally hidden files. Prerequisite: ITN 276. Credit will be given to ITN 275 or ITN 276 and ITN 277, but not all three courses. Lecture 4 hours per week.

ITN 290: Coordinated Internship — Supervises on-the-job training in selected business, industrial or service firms coordinated by the college. Credit/ practice ratio not to exceed 1:5 hours. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Program advisor approval.  Variable hours.

ITN 295: Topics In (3-4 cr.) – Provides an opportunity to explore topical areas of interest to or needed by students. May be used for special honors courses. May be repeated for credit. Variable hours.  3-4 credits.

Information Technology Programming

ITP 100: Software Design (3 cr.) — Introduces principles and practices of software development. Includes instruction in critical thinking, problem solving skills, and essential programming logic in structured and object-oriented design using contemporary tools. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ITP 120: Java Programming I (3 cr.) — Entails instruction in fundamentals of object-oriented programming using Java. Emphasizes program construction, algorithm development, coding, debugging, and documentation of console and graphical user interface applications. Prerequisite: ITP 100 or ITP 102 recommended. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ITP 140: Client Side Scripting (3 cr.) — Provides instruction in fundamentals of Internet application design, development, and deployment using client side scripting language(s). Prerequisites: ENG 111 eligible and recommended ITP 100, ITD 110 and a programming language or equivalent experience. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ITP 251: Systems Analysis and Design (3 cr.) — Focuses on application of information technologies (IT) to system life cycle methodology, systems analysis, systems design, and system implementation practices. Covers methodologies related to identification of information requirements, feasibility in the areas of economic, technical and social requirements, and related issues are included in course content. Software applications may be used to enhance student skills. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ITP 258: Systems Development Project (3 cr.) — Provides instruction in application of life cycle system development methodologies using a case study which incorporates feasibility study system analysis, system design, program specification, and implementation planning. Course project assignment(s) will have students perform as members of system development teams. Prerequisite: Completed ITN 101 or ITN 154, ITP 100, and ITP 251. Corequisite: ITP 120. Lecture 3-4 hours per week.

ITP 290: Coordinated Internship (3 cr.) — Supervises on-the-job training in selected business, industrial or service firms coordinated by the college. Credit/ practice ratio not to exceed 1:5 hours. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Program advisor approval. Variable hours.

J


Japanese

JPN 101: Beginning Japanese I (5 cr.) — Develops the understanding, speaking, reading, and writing of Japanese, and emphasizes the structure of the language. Part I of II. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 5 hours per week. May include one additional hour of oral practice per week.

JPN 102: Beginning Japanese II (5 cr.) — Develops the understanding, speaking, reading, and writing of Japanese, and emphasizes the structure of the language. Part II of II. Prerequisite: Completed JPN 101. Lecture 5 hours per week. May include one additional hour of oral practice per week.

JPN 201: Intermediate Japanese I (4 cr.) — Continues the development of the skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing of Japanese. Classes conducted in Japanese. Prerequisite: JPN 102 or equivalent. Part I of II. Lecture 4 hours per week. May include one additional hour of oral practice per week.

JPN 202: Intermediate Japanese II (4 cr.) — Continues the development of the skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing of Japanese. Classes conducted in Japanese. Prerequisite: Completed JPN 201 or equivalent. Part II of II. Lecture 4 hours per week. May include one additional hour of oral practice per week.

L


Legal Administration

LGL 110: Introduction to Law and the Legal Assistant (3 cr.) — Introduces various areas of law in which a legal assistant may be employed. Includes study of the court system (Virginia and federal) as well as a brief overview of criminal law, torts, domestic relations, evidence, ethics, and the role of the legal assistant, and other areas of interest. Lecture 3 hours per week.

LGL 117: Family Law (3 cr.) — Studies elements of a valid marriage, grounds for divorce and annulment, separation, defenses, custody, support, adoptions, and applicable tax consequences. Includes property settlement, pre-nuptial and ante-nuptial agreements, pleadings, and rules of procedure. May include specific federal and Virginia consumer laws. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

LGL 125: Legal Research (3 cr.) — Provides an understanding of various components of a law library, and emphasizes research skills through the use of digests, encyclopedias, reporter systems, codes, Sheppard’s Citations, ALR and other research tools. May include overview of computer applications and writing projects. Lecture 3 hours per week.

LGL 126: Legal Writing (3 cr.) — Studies proper preparation of various legal documents, including legal memoranda, letters, and pleadings. Involves practical applications. May include case and appellate briefs. Prerequisite: Completed ENG 111 or BUS 236 or permission of instructor. Lecture 3 hours per week.

LGL 200: Ethics for the Legal Assistant (1 cr.) — Examines general principles of ethical conduct applicable to legal assistants. Includes the application of rules of ethics to the practicing legal assistant. Lecture 1 hour per week.

LGL 210: Virginia and Federal Procedure (3 cr.) — Examines the rules of procedure in Virginia and federal court systems, including the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and the Rules of Practice and Procedure in the District Court, Circuit Court, Court of Appeals, and Supreme Court of Virginia. Lecture 3 hours per week.

LGL 216: Trial Preparation and Discovery Practice (3 cr.) — Examines the trial process, including the preparation of a trial notebook, pretrial motions, and orders. May include preparation of interrogatories, depositions, and other discovery tools used in assembling evidence in preparation for the trial or an administrative hearing. Lecture 3 hours per week.

LGL 217: Trial Practice and the Law of Evidence (3 cr.) — Introduces civil and criminal evidence, including kinds, degrees and admissibility of evidence. Studies methods and techniques of evidence acquisition. Emphasizes Virginia and federal rules of evidence. Focuses on the elements and various problems associated with the trial of a civil or criminal case. Lecture 3 hours per week.

LGL 230: Legal Transactions (3 cr.) — Presents an in-depth study of general contract law, including formation, breach, enforcement, and remedies. May include an overview of UCC sales, commercial paper, and collections. Lecture 3 hours per week.

LGL 235: Legal Aspects of Business Organizations (3 cr.) — Studies fundamental principles of agency law and the formation of business organizations. Includes sole proprietorships, partnerships, corporation, limited liability companies, and other business entities. Reviews preparation of the documents necessary for the organization and operation of businesses. Lecture 3 hours per week.

M


Machine Technology

MAC 131-132: Machine Lab I-II (3 cr.) — Teaches fundamental machine shop operations, bench work, layout, measuring tools, and safety. Lecture 0-2 hours. Laboratory 0-3 hours. Total 1-5 hours per week.

MAC 161: Machine Shop Practices I (3 cr.) — Introduces safety procedures, bench work, hand tools, precision measuring instruments, drill presses, cut-off saws, engine lathes, manual surface grinders, and milling machines. Part I of II. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2-3 hours. Total 4-5 hours per week.

MAC 209: Standards, Measurements and Calculations (2-3 cr.) — Presents typical mathematical and mechanical problems requiring the use of reference standards such as the Machinery’s Handbook for solution. Presents use of the Coordinate Measuring Machine for solution. Lecture 2-3 hours per week.  2-3 credits.

Marketing

MKT 100: Principles of Marketing (3 cr.) — Presents principles, methods, and problems involved in marketing to consumers and organizational buyers. Discusses problems and policies connected with distribution and sale of products, pricing, promotion, and buyer motivation. Examines variations of marketing research, legal, social, ethical e-commerce, and international considerations in marketing. Prerequisite: MTE 1-4 and ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

Math Essentials

NOTE: Credit is not applicable toward graduation.

MTE 1: Operations with Positive Fractions (1 cr.) — The student will solve application problems using proper fractions, improper fractions, and mixed numbers.  All student learning outcomes for this unit must be completed without the use of a calculator. Emphasis should be placed on applications throughout the unit. Applications will use U.S. customary units of measurement.  All fractions in this unit should be expressed in simplest form, unless otherwise indicated. Prerequisite: BSK 1 or placement into MTE 1 and completion or co-enrolled with ENF 1. Lecture 4 hours per week.

MTE 2: Operations with Positive Decimals and Percentages (1 cr.) — The student will solve problems using decimals and percentages. Emphasis should be placed on applications throughout the unit. Applications will use U.S. customary and metric units of measurement. Prerequisite:  BSK 1 and MTE 1 and completion or co-enrolled with ENF 1. Lecture 4 hours per week.

MTE 3: Algebra Basics (1 cr.) — The student will perform basic operations with algebraic expressions and solve simple algebraic equations using signed numbers.  Emphasis should be placed on applications throughout the unit. Prerequisite: BSK 1 and MTE 1 – 2 and completion or co-enrolled with ENF 1. Lecture 4 hours per week.

MTE 4: First Degree Equations and Inequalities in One-Variable (1 cr.)
— The student will solve first degree equations and inequalities containing one variable, and use them to solve application problems. Emphasis should be on learning the steps to solving the equations and inequalities, applications and problem solving. Prerequisite: BSK 1 and MTE 1 – 3 and completion or co-enrolled with ENF 1. Lecture 4 hours per week.

MTE 5: Linear Equations, Inequalities and Systems of Linear Equations in Two Variables (1 cr.) — The student will learn how to find the equation of a line, graph linear equations and inequalities in two variables, and solve a system of two linear equations. Emphasis should be on writing and graphing equations using the slope of the line and points on the line, and applications. Prerequisite: BSK 1 and MTE 1 – 4 and completion or co-enrolled with ENF 1. Lecture 4 hours per week.

MTE 6: Exponents, Factoring and Polynomial Equations (1 cr.) — The student will learn techniques to factor polynomials and use these techniques to solve polynomial equations.  Emphasis should be on learning all the different factoring methods, and solving application problems using polynomial equations. Prerequisite: BSK 1 and MTE 1-5 and completion or co-enrolled with ENF 1. Lecture 4 hours per week.

MTE 7: Rational Expressions and Equations (1 cr.) — The student will simplify rational algebraic expressions, solve rational algebraic equations and use them to solve application problems. Prerequisite: BSK 1 and MTE 1-6 and completion or co-enrolled in ENF 1. Lecture 4 hours per week.

MTE 8: Rational Exponents and Radicals (1 cr.) — The student will simplify rational algebraic expressions, solve rational algebraic equations and use them to solve application problems. Prerequisite: BSK 1 and MTE 1-7 and completion or co-enrolled with ENF 1. Lecture 4 hours per week.

MTE 9: Functions, Quadratic Equations and Parabolas (1 cr.) — In this unit, the student will have an introduction to functions in ordered pair, graph, and equation form. The student will engage in a thorough introduction to quadratic functions and their properties as they complete preparation for entering STEM or business-administration college-level mathematics courses. Prerequisite: BSK 1 and MTE 1-8 and completion or co-enrolled with ENF 1. Lecture 4 hours per week.

MCR 4: Learning Support for Quantitative Reasoning (1-2 cr.) — Provides instruction for students who require minimum preparation for college- level Quantitative Reasoning.  Students in this course will be co-enrolled in  MTH 154.  Credits are not applicable toward graduation and do not replace MTE courses waived.  Successful completion of Quantitative Reasoning results in the prerequisite MTE modules being satisfied. Prerequisites: Completion of any three MTE modules 1-5. Corequisite: MTH 154. Variables hours per week.

MCR 5: Learning Support for Statistical Reasoning (1-2 cr.) — Provides instruction for students who require minimum preparation for college-level Statistical Reasoning. Students in this course will be co-enrolled in MTH 154.     Credits are not applicable toward graduation and do not replace MTE courses waived.  Successful completion of Statistical Reasoning results in the prerequisite MTE modules being satisfied. Prerequisite: Completion of any three MTE modules 1-5. Corequisite: MTH 155. Variable hours per week.

MCR 6: Learning Support for Precalculus I (1-2 cr.) — Provides instruction for students who require minimum preparation for college-level Precalculus.  Students in this course will be co-enrolled in MTH 161. Credits not applicable toward graduation and do not replace MTE modules being satisfied. Prerequisite: Completion of any seven MTE modules 1-9. Corequisite: MTH 161. Variable hours per week.

MCR 7: Learning Support for Precalculus with Trigonometry (1-2 cr.)
— Provides instruction for students who require minimum preparation for college-level Precalculus but still need further preparation to succeed. Students in this course will be co-enrolled in MTH 167. Credits not applicable toward graduation and do not replace MTE courses waived. Successful completion of Precalculus w/ Trig results in the prerequisite MTE modules being satisfied. Prerequisite: Completion of any seven of the MTE modules 1-9. Corequisite: MTH 167. Variable hours per week.

Mathematics

MTH 1: Developmental Mathematics (2 cr.) — Designed to bridge the gap between a weak mathematical foundation and the knowledge necessary for the study of mathematics courses in technical, professional, and transfer program. Topics may include arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and trigonometry. Credits not applicable toward graduation. Lecture 2 hours per week.

MTH 120: Introduction to Mathematics (3 cr.) — Introduces number systems, logic, basic algebra, and descriptive statistics. Prerequisites: Completion of MTE 1-3 and ENG 111 eligible. (Intended for occupational/ technical programs.) Lecture 3 hours per week.

MTH 146: Introduction to Elementary Statistics (3 cr.) — Introduces the methods of statistics including sampling from normally distributed populations, estimation, regression, testing of hypotheses, point, and interval estimation methods. Prerequisite:  Completion of MTE 1-5 and ENG 111 eligible. (Intended for occupational/technical programs.) Lecture 3 hours per week.

MTH 151: Mathematics for the Liberal Arts I (3 cr.) — Presents topics in sets, logic, numeration systems, geometric systems, and elementary computer concepts. Prerequisite: Completion of MTE 1-5 and ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.  Note: MTH 151, 152, and 170 may transfer to your four-year institution as the same course – please check transferability requirements of your receiving institution.

MTH 152: Mathematics for the Liberal Arts II (3 cr.) — Presents topics in functions, combinatorics, probability, statistics and algebraic systems. Prerequisite: MTE 1-5 and ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week. Note: MTH 151, 152, and 170 may transfer to your four-year institution as the same course – please check transferability requirements of your receiving institution.

MTH 154: Quantitative Reasoning (3 cr.) — Presents topics in proportional reasoning, modeling, financial literacy and validity studies (logic and set theory). Major emphasis is on the process of taking a real-world situation, identifying the mathematical foundation needed to address the problem, solving the problem and applying what is learned to the original situation. Prerequisite: Competency in MTE 1-5 as demonstrated through placement or unit completion or equivalent OR Corequisite: MCR 4: Learning Support for Quantitative Reasoning and ENG 111 Eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

MTH 155: Statistical Reasoning (3 cr.) — Presents elementary statistical methods and concepts including visual data presentation, descriptive statistics, probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation, and linear regression. Emphasis is placed on the development of statistical thinking, simulation, and the use of statistical software. Prerequisite: Placement or completion of MTH 154 or equivalent and ENG 111 eligible. Lecture: 3 hours per week.

MTH 157: Elementary Statistics (3-4 cr.) — Presents elementary statistical methods and concepts including descriptive statistics, estimation, hypothesis testing, linear regression, and categorical data analysis. (Credit will not be awarded for both MTH 157 and MTH 240 or MTH 241.)Lecture 3-4 hours per week.  Prerequisites: MTE 1-5 and ENG 111 eligible. Note: Credit may not be earned for both MTH 157 and MTH 240. MTH 157 is intended for liberal arts students needing a basic introduction to statistical literacy. For any major that will regularly apply statistics, MTH 240 is recommended. Consult your four-year institution for additional information.

MTH 161:  Precalculus I (3 cr.) — Presents topics in power, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions, and systems of equations and inequalities. Prerequisite: Competency in MTE 1-9 as demonstrated through placement or equivalent OR Corequisite: MCR 6: Learning Support for Precalculus I and ENG 111 Eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

MTH 162: Precalculus II (3 cr.) — Presents trigonometry, trigonometric applications, including Laws of Sines and Cosines, and an introduction to conics. Prerequisite: Placement into MTH 162 or completion of MTH 161 with a grade of C or better and ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

MTH 163: Pre-Calculus I (3 cr.) — Presents college algebra, matrices, and algebraic, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Prerequisite: Placement recommendation for MTH 163 or satisfactory completion of MTE 1-9 and ENG 111 eligible.  (Credit will not be awarded for both MTH 163 and MTH 166.) Lecture 3 hours per week. Note: On-campus MTH 163 is intended for students preparing for MTH 240 or 271.  Dual-enrollment high schools may offer the MTH 163-164 series instead of MTH 166. Students preparing for MTH 173 should register for MTH 166.

MTH 164: Pre-Calculus II (3 cr.) — Presents trigonometry, analytic geometry, and sequences and series. Prerequisite: Completed MTH 163 with a grade of C or higher and ENG 111 eligible. (Credit will not be awarded for both MTH 164 and MTH 168.) Lecture 3 hours per week.

MTH 166: Pre-Calculus with Trigonometry (4-5 cr.) — Presents college algebra, analytic geometry, trigonometry, and algebraic exponential, and logarithmic functions. Lecture 4-5 hours per week. 4-5 credits. Prerequisite: MTE 1-9 or minimum placement recommendation for MTH 163 and ENG 111 eligible. (Credit will not be awarded for both MTH 163 and MTH 166). Note: MTH 166 is intended for students preparing for MTH 173. Dual-enrollment high schools may offer the MTH 163-164 series instead of MTH 166.

MTH 167: Precalculus with Trigonometry (5 cr.) — Presents topics in power, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions, systems of equations, trigonometry, trigonometric applications, including Law of Sines and Cosines, and an introduction to conics. Prerequisite: Competency in MTE 1-9 as demonstrated through placement or unit completion or equivalent OR Corequisite: MCR 7: Learning Support for Precalculus with Trigonometry and ENG 111 eligible.  Lecture 5 hours per week.

MTH 170: Foundations in Contemporary Mathematics (3 cr.) — Covers topics in the mathematics of social choice, management sciences, statistics, and growth. Uses physical demonstrations and modeling techniques to teach the power and utility of mathematics. Prerequisite:  Placement recommendation for MTH 170 or satisfactory completion of MTE 1-5 and ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week. Note: MTH 151, 152, and 170 may transfer to your four-year institution as the same course – please check transferability requirements of your receiving institution.

MTH 173: Calculus with Analytic Geometry I (5 cr.) — Presents analytic geometry and the calculus of algebraic and transcendental functions including the study of limits, derivatives, differentials, and introduction to integration along with their applications. Designed for mathematical, physical, and engineering science programs. Prerequisite: Placement recommendation for MTH 173 or a grade of C or higher in MTH 164 or MTH 166 and ENG 111 eligible. (Credit will not be awarded for more than one of MTH 173, MTH 175 or MTH 273.) Lecture 5 hours per week.

MTH 174: Calculus with Analytic Geometry II (5 cr.) — Continues the study of analytic geometry and the calculus of algebraic and transcendental functions including rectangular, polar, and parametric graphing, indefinite and definite integrals, methods of integration, and power series along with applications. Designed for mathematical, physical, and engineering science programs. Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in MTH 173 or equivalent and ENG 111 eligible. (Credit will not be awarded for more than one of MTH 174, MTH 176, or MTH 274.) Lecture 5 hours per week.

MTH 240: Statistics (3 cr.) — Presents an overview of statistics, including descriptive statistics, elementary probability, probability distribution, estimation, hypothesis testing, and correlation and regression. (Credit will not be awarded for both MTH 240 and MTH 241.) Prerequisite: Placement recommendation for MTH 240 or completion of MTH 151 and 152 or MTH 163 or MTH 170 all with a grade of C or higher and ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week. Note:  Credit may not be earned for MTH 157 and MTH 240. MTH 240 is recommended for students who will regularly apply statistics within their major/career.  MTH 157 provides a basic introduction to statistical literacy. Consult your four-year institution for additional information.

MTH 245: Statistics I (3 cr.) — Presents an overview of statistics, including descriptive statistics, elementary probability, probability distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation, and linear regression. Prerequisite: Placement into MTH 245 or completion of MTH 154 or MTH 161 or equivalent with a grade of C or better and ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

MTH 261: Applied Calculus I (3 cr.) — Introduces limits, continuity, differentiation and integration of algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions, and techniques of integration with an emphasis on applications in business, social sciences, and life sciences. Prerequisite: Placement or completion of MTH 161 or equivalent with a C or better and ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

MTH 263: Calculus I (4 cr.) — Presents concepts of limits, derivatives, differentiation of various types of functions and use of differentiation rules, application of differentiation, antiderivatives, integrals and applications of integration.  Prerequisite: Placement into MTH 263 or completion of MTH 167 or MTH 161/162 or equivalent with a grade of C or better and ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 4 hours per week.

MTH 264: Calculus II (4 cr.) — Continues the study of calculus of algebraic and transcendental functions including rectangular, polar, and parametric graphing, indefinite and definite integrals, methods of integration, and power series along with applications.  Features instruction for mathematical, physical, and engineering science programs. Prerequisite: Completion of MTH 263 or equivalent with a C or better and ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 4 hours per week.

MTH 265: Calculus III (4 cr.) — Focuses on extending the concepts of function, limit, continuity, derivative, integral and vector from the plane to the three dimensional space. Topics include vector functions, multivariate functions, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and an introduction to vector calculus. Features instruction for mathematical, physical, and engineering science programs. Prerequisite: Completion of MTH 264 or equivalent with a grade of C or better and ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 4 hours per week.

MTH 266: Linear Algebra (3 cr.) — Covers matrices, vector spaces, determinants, solutions of systems of linear equations, basis and dimension, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. Features instruction for mathematical, physical, and engineering science programs. Prerequisite: Completion of MTH 263 or equivalent with a grade of B or better OR MTH 264 or equivalent with a grade of C or better and ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

MTH 267: Differential Equations (3 cr.) — Introduces ordinary differential equations. Includes first order differential equations, second and higher order ordinary differential equations with applications, and numerical methods. Prerequisite: MTH 264 or equivalent with a grade of C or better and ENG 111 eligible.  Lecture 3 hours per week.

MTH 271: Applied Calculus I (3 cr.) — Presents limits, continuity, differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions with applications, and an introduction to integration. Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in MTH 163 and ENG 111 eligible. (Credit will not be awarded for both MTH 270 and MTH 271.) Lecture 3 hours per week.

MTH 277: Vector Calculus (4 cr.) — Presents vector valued functions, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and topics from the calculus of vectors. Designed for mathematical, physical, and engineering science programs. Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in MTH 174 or equivalent and ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 4 hours per week.

MTH 279: Ordinary Differential Equations (4 cr.) — Introduces ordinary differential equations. Includes first order differential equations, second and higher order ordinary differential equations with application. Designed for mathematical, physical, and engineering science programs. Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in MTH 174 or equivalent and ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 4 hours per week.

MTH 285: Linear Algebra (3 cr.) — Covers matrices, vector spaces, determinants, solutions of systems of linear equations, basis and dimension, Eigen values, and Eigen vectors. Designed for mathematical, physical and engineering science programs. Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in MTH 174 or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours per week.

Mechanical Engineering

MEC 154: Mechanical Maintenance I (3 cr.) — Provides an overview of basic maintenance techniques and processes for industrial mechanics and technicians who are installing and maintaining industrial mechanical and power transmission components. Lecture 2-3 hours. Laboratory 0-2 hours. Total 3-4 hours per week.

MEC 161: Basic Fluid Mechanics – Hydraulics/Pneumatics (3 cr.) — Introduces theory, operation and maintenance of hydraulic/ pneumatics devices and systems. Emphasizes the properties of fluids, fluid flow, fluid statics, and the application of Bernouli’s equation. Lecture 2-3 hours. Laboratory 2-3 hours. Total 4-6 hours per week.

MEC 162: Applied Hydraulics and Pneumatics (2-3 cr.) — Introduces hydraulic and pneumatic systems found in construction equipment, road vehicles, and farm equipment. Includes the basic theory, construction, maintenance and repair of hydraulic and pneumatic power systems. Lecture 1-3 hours. Laboratory 0-3 hours. Total 2-5 hours per week.

MEC 165: Applied Hydraulics, Pneumatics, and Hydrostatics (3 cr.) — Teaches fluid power system design, operation, testing, maintenance and repair. Includes reservoirs, pump connecting valves, cylinders, pressure regulating valves, flow control valves, hydraulic motors, and introduction to basic hydrostatic hydraulic systems. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

MEC 265: Fluid Mechanics (3 cr.) — Studies properties of fluids and fluid flow, Bernouli’s theorem, measuring devices, viscosity and dimensional analysis. Emphasizes fluid statics, flow in pipes and channels, and pumps. Lecture 3 hours per week.

Music

MUS 101-102: Basic Musicianship I-II (3 cr.) — Provides exercises leading to knowledge and skill in the rudiments of music. Includes rhythmic notation as well as scales, keys, and intervals along with exercises in sight reading and ear training. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

MUS 121-122: Music Appreciation I-II (3 cr.) —Increases the variety and depth of the student’s interest, knowledge, and involvement in music and related cultural activities. Acquaints the student with traditional and twentieth century music literature, emphasizing the relationship music has as an art form with man and society. Increases the student’s awareness of the composers and performers of all eras through listening and concert experiences. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week. Need not be taken in sequence.

MUS 225: The History of Jazz (3 cr.) — Studies the underlying elements of jazz, concentrating on its cultural and historical development from earliest stages to the present. No previous knowledge of music is required. Lecture 3 hours per week.

N


Natural Science

NAS 150: Human Biology (3 cr.) — Surveys the structure and function of the human body. Applies principally to students who are not majoring in the health or science fields. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

NAS 161: Health Science I(4 cr.) — Presents an integrated approach to human anatomy and physiology, microbiology, and pathology. Includes chemistry and physics as related to health sciences. Prerequisite for NAS 161: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours. Recitation and laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

NAS 162: Health Science II (4 cr.) – Presents an integrated approach to human anatomy and physiology, microbiology, and pathology. Includes chemistry and physics as related to health sciences. Prerequisite: Completed NAS 161. Lecture 3 hours. Recitation and laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

Nursing

NSG 100: Introduction to Nursing Concepts (4 cr.) — Introduces concepts of nursing practice and conceptual learning. Focuses on basic nursing concepts with an emphasis on safe nursing practice and the development of the nursing process. Provides supervised learning experiences in college nursing laboratories and/or simulated environments. Prerequisite: BIO 141. Corequisite: NSG 106, NSG 130, and NSG 200. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

NUR 100: Introduction to Nursing and Health (1 cr.) — Introduces concepts of nursing and health. Includes historical and cultural aspects, legal, and ethical responsibilities and an overview of health and the health care delivery system. Prerequisite: Admission into the Associates in Applied Science Nursing program.  Licensed LPN’s wishing to take the class need to contact a nursing advisor for assistance. Lecture 1 hour per week.

NSG 106: Competencies for Nursing Practice (2 cr.) — Focuses on the application of concepts through clinical skill development. Emphasizes the use of clinical judgement in skill acquisition. Includes principles of safety, evidence- based practice, informatics and math computational skills. Prepares students  to demonstrate competency in specific skills and drug dosage calculation including the integration of skills in the care of clients in simulated settings. Provides supervised learning experiences in college nursing laboratories and/or simulated environments. Prerequisite: BIO 141.  Corequisite: NSG 100, NSG 130, and NSG 200.  Lecture 0-1 hour. Laboratory 4-6 hours. Total 4-6 hours a week.

NUR 111: Nursing I (8 cr.) — Introduces nursing principles including concepts of health and wellness and the nursing process. Develops nursing skills to meet the bio-psycho-social needs of individuals across the lifespan. Includes math computational skills, basic computer instruction related to the delivery of nursing care, communication skills, introduction to nursing, health, the health care system, legal aspects of nursing care, diagnostic testing, assessment, teaching and learning, asepsis, body mechanics and safety, personal care, activity/rest, wound care, nutrition, elimination, oxygenation, fluid and electrolytes, pain control, medication administration, aging populations and pre/post-operative care. Provides supervised learning experiences. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Total 16 hours per week. Prerequisite: Admission into the Associates in Applied Nursing Program required.  8 credits

NUR 112: Nursing II (8 cr.) — Focuses on the nursing care of adults experiencing changes along the health/illness continuum that are common, well-defined, and have predictable outcomes. Includes math computational skills, basic computer instruction related to the delivery of nursing care; acid base balance, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, musculoskeletal, immunology, oncology, sensorineural, infectious diseases, endocrine, respiratory and blood disorders and care of the dying client. Provides supervised learning experiences in college nursing laboratories and/or cooperating agencies. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Total 16 hours per week. 8 credits. Prerequisite: Completed NUR 111.

NUR 115: LPN Transition (3 cr.) — Introduces the role of the registered nurse through concepts and skill development in the discipline of professional nursing. This course serves as a bridge course for licensed practical nurses and is based upon individualized articulation agreements, mobility exams, or other assessment criteria as they relate to local programs and service areas. Includes math computational skills and basic computer instruction related to the delivery of nursing care. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week. Prerequisites: Completed BIO 141 and ITE 115. Licensed LPNs wishing to take the course need to contact a nursing program chair advisor for assistance.

NUR 116: Selected Nursing Concepts-Nursing Medication Skills & Simulation (1 cr.) — The Course is designed as a simulation/skills lab course for the novice or more experienced student to give an overview of pharmacology while primarily focusing on safely and competently administering medications. The simulation will provide opportunity to decipher physician orders and enhance knowledge on medication classifications and use throughout specific patient populations (pediatric, geriatric, adult, and critical care).

NSG 130: Professional Nursing Concepts (1 cr.) — Introduces the role of the professional nurse and fundamental concepts in professional development. Focuses on professional identity, legal/ethical issues and contemporary trends in professional nursing. Prerequisite: BIO 141. Corequisite: NSG 100, NSG 106, and NSG 200.  Lecture 1 hour. Total 1 hour per week.

NUR 135: Drug Dosage Calculations (1 cr.) — Focuses on apothecary, metric, household conversion in medication dosage calculation for adult and pediatric clients. Provides a practical approach to learning to calculate and prepare medications and solutions. Includes calculating intravenous flow rates. Prerequisite: Admission to the Associates of Applied Sciences Nursing Program and Satisfied MTE 1-3. Licensed LPNs wishing to take the course need to contact a nursing department chair advisor for assistance. Lecture 1 hour per week.

NUR 142: Fundamentals of Surgical Care II (3 cr.) — Introduces principles of wound healing including types, stages, and complications; types, preparation and care of surgical supplies, packing, dressings, catheters, drains, tubes, supplies, and equipment; classifications of instruments, sutures and needles. Describes responsibilities related to the scrub and circulating roles. Provides students practical experience in the operating room. Prerequisite: Licensed Practical Nurse in Virginia. Co-requisite: NUR 280 and documentation of current immunizations and other credentials. Note: SURGICAL SCRUB CERTIFICATE COURSE FOR LPNs. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

NSG 152: Health Care Participant (3 cr.) — Focuses on the health and wellness of the health care participant defined as individuals and families in a variety of communities throughout the lifespan. Covers concepts that focus on client attributes and preferences regarding health care. Emphasizes population-focused care. Provides supervised learning experiences in college nursing laboratories and/or cooperating agencies.  Prerequisite: BIO 142, NSG 100, NSG 106, NSG 130, NSG 200. Corequisite: NSG 170.  Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

NSG 170: Health/Illness Concepts (6 cr.) — Focuses on the nursing care of individuals and/or families throughout the lifespan with an emphasis on health and illness concepts. Includes concepts of nursing care for the antepartum client and clients with common and predictable illnesses. Provides supervised learning experiences in college nursing laboratories and/or simulated environments. Prerequisite:  BIO 142, NSG 100, NSG 106, NSG 130. Co-requisite: NSG 152.

NSG 200: Health Promotion and Assessment (3 cr.) — Introduces assessment and health promotion for the individual and family. Includes assessment of infants, children, adults, geriatric clients and pregnant females. Emphasizes health history and the acquisition of physical assessment skills with underlying concepts of development, communication, and health promotion. Prepares students to demonstrate competency in the assessment of clients across the lifespan.  Provides supervised learning experiences in college nursing laboratories and/or simulated environments. Prerequisite: BIO 141. Corequisite: NSG 100, NSG 106, NSG 130. Lecture 2 hours.  Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

NSG 210: Health Care Concepts I (5 cr.) — Focuses on care of clients across the lifespan in multiple settings including concepts related to psychological health alterations and reproduction. Emphasizes the nursing process in the development of clinical judgement for clients with multiple needs. Provides supervised learning experiences in college nursing laboratories and/or simulated environments. Prerequisite: NSG 152, NSG 170.  Co-requisite: NSG 211.  Lecture 3 hours.  Laboratory 6 hours. Total 9 hours per week.

NSG 211: Health Care Concepts II (5 cr.) — Focuses on care of clients across the lifespan in multiple settings including concepts related to psychological health alterations. Emphasizes the nursing process in the development of clinical judgement for clients with multiple needs. Provides supervised learning experiences in college nursing laboratories and/or simulated environments.  Prerequisite: NSG 152, NSG 170. Co-requisite: NSG 210.  Lecture 3 hours.  Laboratory 6 hours. Total 9 hours per week.

NUR 216: Integrated Concepts II (8 cr.) — Focuses on nursing care of individuals/families requiring the integration of complex concepts of nursing related to psychiatric and medical/surgical disorders throughout the lifespan. Includes math computational skills, basic computer instruction related to the delivery of nursing care; psychiatric, respiratory, regulatory, endocrine and hematological disorders. Uses all concepts of the nursing process with increasing degrees of skill. Provides supervised learning experiences in college nursing laboratories and/or cooperating agencies. Prerequisites determined by local college. Lecture 4 hours per week. Laboratory 12 hours per week. Total 16 hours per week. Prerequisites: NUR 112 and NUR 115 and Admission into the Associates in Applied Science Nursing Program.

NUR 217: Integrated Concepts III (8 cr.) — Focuses on nursing care of individuals/families requiring the integration concepts related to nursing care of complex medical/surgical disorders. Includes math computational skills, basic computer instruction related to the delivery of nursing care; sensory, neurological, integumentary, renal and cardiovascular disorders; and, nursing care of clients experiencing major trauma. Uses all concepts of the nursing process with increasing degrees of skill. Provides supervised learning experiences in college nursing laboratories and/or cooperating agencies. Prerequisites determined by local college. Lecture 1-8 hours. Lecture 4 hours per week. Laboratory 12 hours per week. Total 16 hours per week. Prerequisite: Completed NUR 216.

NUR 226: Health Assessment (2 cr.) — Introduces the systematic approach to obtaining a health history and performing a physical assessment. Prerequisite: Admission into the Associates in Applied Sciences Nursing Program.  Licensed LPNs wishing to take the class need to contact a nursing department chair advisor for assistance. Lecture 0-2 hours. Laboratory 2-9 hours. Total 3-9 hours per week.

NSG 230: Advanced Professional Nursing Concepts (2 cr.) — Develops the role of the professional nurse in the healthcare environment in preparation     for practice as a registered nurse. Introduces leadership and management concepts and focuses on the integration of professional behaviors in a variety of healthcare settings.  Prerequisite: NSG 210, NSG 211. Corequisite: NSG 252, NSG 270. Lecture 2 hours. Total 2 hours per week.

NUR 245: Maternal/Newborn Nursing (3cr.) — Develops nursing skills in caring for families in the antepartum, intrapartum, and post-partum periods. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Completion of NUR 112 and Admission into the Associates in Applied Science Nursing Program.

NSG 252: Complex Health Concepts (4 cr.) — Focuses on nursing care of diverse individuals and families integrating complex health concepts. Emphasizes clinical judgement , patient-centered care and collaboration. Prerequisite: NSG 210, NSG 211. Corequisite: NSG 230, NSG 270.  Lecture 4 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

NUR 254: Dimensions of Professional Nursing (2 cr.) — Explores the role of the professional nurse. Emphasizes nursing organizations, legal and ethical implications, and addresses trends in management and organizational skills. Explores group dynamics, relationships, conflicts, and leadership styles. Lecture 2 hours per week. Prerequisite: Completed NUR 112.

NSG 270: Nursing Capstone (4 cr.) — Provides students the opportunity to comprehensively apply and integrate learned concepts from previous nursing courses into a capstone experience. Emphasizes the mastery of patient- centered care, safety, nursing judgement, professional behaviors, informatics, quality improvement, and collaboration in the achievement of optimal outcomes of care. Provides supervised learning experiences in faculty and/or preceptor-guided college nursing laboratories and/or simulated environments. Prerequisite: NSG 210, NSG 211. Co-requisite: NSG 230, 252.  Laboratory 12 hours. Total 12 hours per week.

NUR 280: Introduction to Perioperative Nursing (4 cr.) — Introduces the surgical environment, ethical and legal patient and employee rights, preparation of the patient for surgery, surgical conscience, and the operative nurse’s role and responsibilities. Includes laboratory and clinical experience. Lecture 2. Laboratory 6 hours. Total 8 hours per week. Prerequisite: Practical Nurse Licensed in Virginia. Co-requisite: NUR 142 and documentation of immunizations and other credentials. Note: SURGICAL SCRUB CERTIFICATE COURSE FOR LPNs.

NUR 281: Advanced Perioperative Nursing (5 cr.) — Focuses on the technical and clinical aspects of perioperative nursing, including perioperative pharmacology, risk management and quality improvement, monitoring and documentation, and standard precautions. Includes laboratory and clinical experience. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Total 11 hours per week. Prerequisite: NUR 142 and NUR 280 and Licensed Practical Nurse in Virginia and documentation of current immunizations and other credentials.

P


Philosophy

PHI 100: Introduction to Philosophy (3 cr.) — Presents an introduction to philosophical problems and perspectives with emphasis on the systematic questioning of basic assumptions about meaning, knowledge, reality, and values. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

PHI 101-102: Introduction to Philosophy I-II (3 cr.) — Introduces a broad spectrum of philosophical problems and perspectives with an emphasis on the systematic questioning of basic assumptions about meaning, knowledge, reality, and values. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week. Must be taken in sequence.

PHI 111: Logic I (3 cr.) — Introduces inductive and deductive reasoning, with an emphasis on common errors and fallacies. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

PHI 200: The History of Western Philosophy (3 cr.) — Offers a brief historical survey of major philosophers from the pre-Socratics to the present. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

PHI 220: Ethics (3 cr.) — Provides a systematic study of representative ethical systems. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

PHI 226: Social Ethics (3 cr.) — Provides a critical examination of moral problems and studies the application of ethical concepts and principles to decision-making. Topics may include abortion, capital punishment, euthanasia, man and the state, sexuality, war and peace, and selected issues of personal concern. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

PHI 227: Bio-Medical Ethics (3 cr.) — Examines the ethical implications of specific biomedical issues in the context of major ethical systems. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

PHI 265: Philosophy of Religion (3 cr.) — Examines problems raised by arguments for and against the existence of God and discusses such topics as the nature of God, the nature of religious experience, the problem of evil, religious truth and language, immortality, miracles, spirituality, and the relation between philosophy and theology. Lecture 3 hours per week.

PHI 276: Women and Western Philosophy (3 cr. ) — Studies the concept, role and clue of women in the canon of Western Philosophy from Plato to contemporary philosophy. Discusses controversies in feminist social ethics, including marketing femininity, pornography, censorship, women in the work force and women’s fertility. Lecture 3 hours per week.

Photography

PHT 164: Introduction to Digital Photography (3 cr.) — Teaches the fundamentals of photography including camera function, composition, and image production as they apply to digital imagery. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 4 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

Physical Education

PED 100: Pilates (2 cr.) — Provides a method of mind-body exercise and physical movement designed to stretch, strengthen, balance the body, and improve posture and core stabilization while increasing body awareness. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 3 hours per week.

PED 103: Aerobic Fitness I (2 cr.) — Develops cardiovascular fitness though activities designed to elevate and sustain heart rates appropriate to age and physical condition. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 3 hours per week.

PED 109: Yoga (2 cr.) — Focuses on the forms of yoga training emphasizing flexibility. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 3 hours per week.

PED 111: Weight Training I (1 cr.) – Focuses on muscular strength and endurance training through individualized workout programs. Teaches appropriate use of weight training equipment. Lecture 0 hours.  Laboratory 2 hours. Total 2 hours per week.

PED 112: Weight Training II (1 cr.) — Focuses on muscular strength and endurance training through individualized workout programs. Teaches appropriate use of weight training equipment. Prerequisite for PED 112: Completed PED 111. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 2 hours per week.

PED 116: Lifetime Fitness and Wellness (2 cr.) — Provides a study of fitness and wellness and their relationship to a healthy lifestyle. Defines fitness and wellness, evaluates the student’s level of fitness and wellness, and motivates the student to incorporate physical fitness and wellness into daily living. A personal fitness/wellness plan is required for the 2-credit course. Lecture 0-1 hours. Laboratory 2-4 hours. Total 2-4 hours per week. Lecture 0-1 hours. Laboratory 2-4 hours. Total 2-4 hours per week.

PED 120: Yoga II (1-2 cr.) — Focuses on the forms of yoga training emphasizing flexibility. Prerequisite: PED 109.  Lecture 0-1 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 2-3 hours per week.

PED 128: Horseback Riding (2 cr.) — Presents riding seats and preparation for riding, care and grooming of a horse, selection, use and care of equipment, and safety. Prerequisite appropriate riding skills or instructor’s permission for advanced course. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 3 hours per week.

PED 129: Self-Defense (2 cr.) — Examines history, techniques, and movements associated with self-defense. Introduces the skills and methods of self- defense emphasizing mental and physical discipline. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 3 hours per week.

PED 133: Golf I (1 cr.) — Teaches basic skills of golf, rules, etiquette, scoring, terminology, equipment selection and use, and strategy. Lecture 0-1 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 2-4 hours per week.

PED 135 Bowling I (1 cr.) —Teaches basic bowling skills and techniques, scoring, rules, etiquette and terminology. Lecture 0 hours.  Laboratory 2 hours. Total 2 hours per week.

PED 136: Bowling II (1 cr.) — Teaches basic bowling skills and techniques, scoring, rules, etiquette, and terminology. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 2 hours per week.

PED 137: Martial Arts I (2 cr.) — Emphasizes forms, styles, and techniques of body control, physical and mental discipline, and physical fitness. Presents a brief history of development of martial arts theory and practice. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 3 hours per week.

PED 150: Soccer (1 cr.) — Emphasizes soccer skills and techniques, strategies, rules, equipment, and physical conditioning. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 2 hours per week.

PED 154: Volleyball (1 cr.) — Introduces skills, techniques, strategies, rules, and scoring.  Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 3 hours per week.

PED 156: Softball (1-2 cr.) — Emphasizes skills, techniques, strategies, rules. Lecture 0-1 hour. Laboratory 2-4 hours. Total 2-4 hours per week.

PED 157: Soccer II (1 cr.) — Emphasizes advanced soccer skills and techniques, strategies, rules, equipment, and physical conditioning. Prerequisite: PED 150. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 2 hours per week.

PED 160: Modern Dance (1-2 cr.) — Teaches the basic techniques of creative dance. Skills include self-expression, contemporary routines, dance forms, and basic choreography. Lecture 0-1 hour. Laboratory 2-4 hours. Total 2-4 hours per week.

PED 170: Tai Chi I (2 cr.) — Develops an understanding of the Theories and practices of Tai Chi. Explores the energy of exercise that will tone muscles, improve circulation and increase flexibility and balance. Discusses history and philosophy of exercise and relaxation techniques for stress reduction. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 3 hours per week.

PED 171: Ballroom Dance 1 (1-2 cr.) – Presents the basic step patterns, rhythmic patterns, and positions in ballroom dance. Includes techniques based upon traditional steps with basic choreographic patterns. Part I of II. Lecture 0-1 hours. Laboratory 2-4 hours. Total 2-4 hours per week.

PED 187: Backpacking (2 cr.) — Focuses on the preparation for backpacking trip, equipment and clothing selection, personal and group safety, ecology, and physical conditioning. Includes field experience. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 3 hours per week.

PED 254: Advanced Volleyball (2 cr.) — Emphasizes advanced volleyball skills, techniques, strategies, rules, and scoring. Prerequisites: PED 154 or advisor approval. Lecture 0 hours. Lab hours 2-4. Total 2-4 hours per week

Physical Therapist Assistant

PTH 105: Introduction to Physical Therapist Assisting (2 cr.) – Introduces the physical therapist assistant student to the field of physical therapy practice and develops basic patient care skills for application in the initial physical therapy clinical experience. This course is designed to prepare the student to administer basic patient care skills, directed by an instructor, which consistently demonstrate safety and compliance with the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) Standards of Practice and Code of Ethical Conduct for the Physical Therapist Assistant. Additionally, the course prepares the student to identify him/herself appropriately in the role of physical therapist assistant and guides the student in effective relationships with all members of the healthcare team. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 4 hours per week. Prerequisite: Admission into the Associate of Applied Science Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA) Program.

PTH 110: Medical Reporting (1 cr.) – Emphasizes the principles of medical reporting, including the ability to abstract pertinent information from actual medical records. Includes the writing of patient progress notes in standardized formats and medical terminology. This course reinforces basic knowledge from PTH 105 – Introduction to Physical Therapist Assisting, including additional medical terminology and documentation skills. Competency in documentation of tests and measures, physical therapy interventions and patient response is emphasized. Lecture 1 hour. Total 1 hour per week. Prerequisites: PTH 105, PTH 121, PTH 151 and admission into the PTA Program.

PTH 115: Kinesiology for the Physical Therapist Assistant (4 cr.) – Focuses on the relationship of specific joint structure and function, the role of individual muscles and groups of muscles and neurologic principles in both normal and pathological movement. The course includes a review of basic physics and biomechanical principles applied to human movement.  Includes specific posture and gait analysis. This course is designed to develop the student’s understanding of basic physics principles which govern dynamic systems, and to provide detailed information regarding joint structure and function, individual muscles and muscle function, enabling the student to interpret human movement and appraise performance as normal or dysfunctional. Patient examination methods such as goniometry, manual muscle testing and selected special tests are included. Selected orthopedic and neuromuscular pathologies are introduced. Lecture 3 hours.  Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.  Prerequisites: PTH 105, PTH 121, PTH 151 and admission into the PTA Program.

PTH 121: Therapeutic Procedures I (5 cr.) Prepares the student to properly and safely administer basic physical therapy procedures utilized by physical therapist assistants. The procedures include therapeutic modalities. Procedures may include therapeutic exercise, electrotherapy and cardiopulmonary rehabilitation. Part I of II. This course prepares the student to apply physical agents, therapeutic modalities, and therapeutic soft tissue mobilization techniques. Selected cardiopulmonary pathologies are introduced as well as Universal Precautions/Isolation techniques. In addition, the course will provide the student with the background to determine applicability of the stated procedures and the skills to determine response to treatment. Proper documentation and communication of the treatment application and patient response is included. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Total 9 hours per week. Prerequisites: Admission into the PTA Program.

PTH 122: Therapeutic Procedures II (5 cr.) Prepares the student to properly and safely administer basic physical therapy procedures utilized by physical therapist assistants. The procedures include therapeutic modalities.  Procedures may include therapeutic exercise, electrotherapy and cardiopulmonary rehabilitation. Part II of II. This course prepares the student to apply therapeutic exercise, electrotherapy modalities and cardiopulmonary rehabilitation techniques. In addition, the course will provide the student with the knowledge needed to determine the applicability of stated procedures: safety of providing an intervention, indication of the procedures and the ability to determine response/success of the treatment(s) administered. Therapeutic exercise program design/progression and proper documentation and communication of the treatment application and patient outcomes are included.  Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Total 9 hours per week. Prerequisites: PTH 105, PTH 121, PTH 151 and admission into the PTA Program.

PTH 131: Clinical Education I (2 cr.) – Provides supervised instruction in the delivery of physical therapy in one of various clinical settings. Emphasizes the practice of all therapeutic skills learned in the first year, including direct patient care skills and all forms of communication. Clinical Education I is the first of three comprehensive clinical education experiences in the physical therapy setting. The purpose of the initial experience is to apply, integrate, and perform learned clinical skills on patients under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist (PT) and/or physical therapist assistant (PTA). Basic patient care skills, anatomy/biomechanics, therapeutic exercise, and selected assessment techniques are included. Selected pathological and disease conditions will be emphasized. Practice settings may include acute care hospitals, private practice, skilled nursing centers, and out-patient rehabilitation centers. Knowledge, skills and attitudes learned during the didactic courses will be applied to direct patient/client care. This course integrates the practice of all first year PTA coursework with the objective of students providing quality care for uncomplicated patients with a high degree of supervision and guidance. Total 10 hours per week. Prerequisites: Completed PTH 105, PTH 121, PTH 151, and admission into the PTA Program.  Co-requisites: PTH 110, PTH 115, PTH 122. Additional requirements: Evidence of current CPR certification, professional liability insurance, required immunizations, background check and drug screen.

PTH 151: Musculoskeletal Structure and Function (5 cr.) In-depth study of the human musculoskeletal system. Covers terms of position and movement, location and identification of specific bony landmarks, joint structure and design, ligaments, muscle origin, action and innervation, and types of contraction. This course will prepare the student for the principles of kinesiology and ultimately for physical therapy treatment for musculoskeletal conditions. The ability to identify and examine the musculoskeletal anatomy is the foundation for understanding both normal and abnormal movement. This course provides the foundation for more complex analysis of functional human mobility.  Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Total 9 hours per week. Prerequisite: Admission into the PTA Program.

PTH 210:  Psychological Aspects of Therapy (2 cr.) – Focuses on the psychological reactions and sociological impact of illness and injury in clients and their families, and among health care givers who work with them. Examines individual self-identity and the nature of changing client/therapist relationships across the life span. This course is designed to help the student identify and interpret personal values, multicultural factors, developmental characteristics associated with age, physical and psychosocial experiences, gender relationships and the influence of acute, chronic and terminal illness which affect the client’s clinical outcome. Emphasis is placed on discrimination of important factors, internalizing knowledge of personal values/biases and the development of effective treatment relationships. Skills are applied to the interactions between the student physical therapist assistant (SPTA) and clients, caregivers, supervisors and coworkers. This course will also address stress management, conflict resolution and reduction of negativity as a means of assisting the student in maintaining a healthy therapeutic relationship with clients, caregivers and healthcare professionals. Lecture 2 hours. Total 2 hours per week.  Prerequisites: PTH 115, PTH 122, PTH 110, PTH 131 and admission into the PTA Program.

PTH 225:  Rehabilitation Procedures (5 cr.) – Focuses on treatment techniques typical of long term rehabilitation, e.g., the rehabilitation of congenital, neurological and disfigurement associated with chronic injury and disease. This course will prepare the student for clinical application of therapeutic exercise for the patient with long term rehabilitation needs, with specific focus on neurological pathologies and the recovery process. Lifespan development and concerns related to pediatric and geriatric patient populations are covered, including cognition and motivational principles for each. Laboratory practice will provide hands-on experience with a wide variety of interventions including specialized treatment such as neuromuscular facilitation techniques and balance interventions. Lecture 3 hours.  Laboratory 6 hours. Total 9 hours per week.  Prerequisites: PTH 115, PTH 122, PTH 110, PTH 131 and admission into the PTA Program.

PTH 226: Therapeutic Exercise (4 cr.) – Emphasizes the basic principles underlying different approaches to exercise including rationale for treatment and may include neurological treatments such as simple facilitation and inhibitory techniques and the teaching of home programs. This course will prepare the student for clinical application of therapeutic exercise to a diverse patient population. This course will focus on various pathologies including acute and chronic musculoskeletal, cardiopulmonary, and endocrine and other systemic diseases, and the progression of exercises and related treatments for each.  Modifications required for different clinical settings across the care continuum are discussed, with primary focus on inpatient, rehab, skilled nursing and home health care. Tests and measures to collect data, determine appropriate treatment progression, and document progress measurably are addressed.  Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week. Prerequisites:  PTH 225, PTH 210, PTH 251 and admission into the PTA program.

PTH 251:  Clinical Practicum I (3 cr.) – Provides instruction in local health care facilities in the actual administration of physical therapy treatments under the supervision of licensed physical therapists. Provides experience in a variety of clinical settings. Part I of II. Clinical Practicum I is the second of three comprehensive clinical experiences in the physical therapy setting. The purpose of this intermediate experience is to apply, integrate and perform learned clinical skills on patients under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist (PT) and/or physical therapist assistant (PTA). The emphasis of this experience is on integrating previously learned PTA skills, therapeutic modalities, advanced therapeutic techniques, and neurophysiological techniques into an established physical therapy program. Typical practice settings may include acute care hospitals, private practice, home health, sports centers, developmental centers, skilled nursing centers, geriatrics, pediatrics, inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation centers and VA hospitals. The objective of this clinical education experience is for students to provide quality care for uncomplicated to complex patients with a degree of supervision and guidance that will vary with the complexity of the patient or the environment. Total 15 hours per week. Prerequisites:  Completed PTH 115, PTH 110, PTH 122, PTH 131, and admission into the PTA program. Co-requisites: PTH 210, PTH 225. Additional requirements: Evidence of current CPR certification, professional liability insurance, required immunizations, background check and drug screen.

PTH 252: Clinical Practicum II (4 cr.) – Provides instruction in local health care facilities in the actual administration of physical therapy treatments under the supervision of licensed physical therapists. Provides experience in a variety of clinical settings. Part II of II. Clinical Practicum II is the third of three comprehensive clinical experiences in a physical therapy setting. The purpose of this final experience is to apply, integrate, and perform learned clinical skills on patients under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist (PT) and/or physical therapist assistant (PTA). The emphasis is to integrate previously learned and practiced PTA skills, special topics, and clinical management and healthcare issues into the delivery of a comprehensive physical therapy treatment program. Practice settings may include acute care hospitals, private practice, sports centers, developmental centers, skilled nursing centers, geriatrics, pediatrics, inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation centers and VA hospitals. The overall objectives of this clinical education experience are development of clinical reasoning skills and the provision of high quality care for non-complicated to complex patients under the supervision of a PT or PTA. The degree of supervision and guidance will vary with the complexity of the patient or the environment from none to minimal. Total 16 hours per week. Prerequisites: Completed PTH 110, PTH 115, PTH 122, PTH 131, PTH 151, PTH 210, PTH 225. Co-requisites: PTH 226 and PTH 255. Additional requirements: Evidence of current CPR certification, professional liability insurance, required immunizations, background check and drug screen.

PTH 255:  Seminar in Physical Therapy (2 cr.) – Includes preparation for licensing examination, specialized lectures, and preparation of a student project. This course is designed to provide a summary of all coursework and clinical education experiences to date. Student preparation for transition into the workforce as an entry-level PTA will be conducted in a seminar format. Seminar topics are structured to prepare the student to enter the practice of physical therapy, e.g., resume preparation, interview skills, performance evaluations, administrative responsibilities associated with employment, licensure examination preparation, etc. Selected clinic topics that are new in the practice environment are also included. Lecture 2 hours. Total 2 hours per week. Prerequisites: Prerequisites:  PTH 225, PTH 210, PTH 251 and admission into the PTA program.

Physics

PHY 201-202: General College Physics I-II (4 cr.) — Teaches fundamental principles of physics. Covers mechanics, thermodynamics, wave phenomena, electricity and magnetism, and selected topics in modern physics. Prerequisite for PHY 201: MTH 163 or equivalent and ENG 111 eligible. Prerequisite for PHY 202: Completed PHY 201. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

PHY 241-242: University Physics I-II (4 cr.) — Teaches principles of classical and modern physics. Includes mechanics, wave phenomena, heat, electricity, magnetism, relativity, and nuclear physics. Prerequisite for PHY 241: MTH 173 or MTH 273 or divisional approval and ENG 111 eligible. Prerequisite for PHY 242: MTH 174 or MTH 274 or divisional approval and PHY 241. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

PHY 299: Supervised Study (1 cr.) — Capstone Presentation: Assigns a project for independent study incorporating previous instruction and supervised by the instructor. Co-requisite: a 200 level science course.

Political Science

PLS 120: Introduction to Political Science (3 cr.) — Teaches basic concepts and methods of the discipline of political science through study of political dimensions of a selected topic. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible.

PLS 135: American National Politics (3 cr.) — Teaches political institutions and processes of the national government of the United States. Focuses on the Congress, presidency, and the courts, and on their inter-relationships. Gives attention to public opinion, suffrage, elections, political parties, interest groups, civil rights, domestic policy, and foreign relations. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

PLS 136: State and Local Politics (3 cr.) — Teaches structure, powers and functions of state and local government in the United States. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

PLS 140: Introduction to Comparative Politics (3 cr.) — Teaches basic concepts and methods of comparative politics. Includes analyses of government and politics in a variety of nations around the world. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

PLS 200: Political Ideologies (3 cr.) — Analyzes and critically evaluates many leading ideologies of the modern world, such as anarchism, nationalism, fascism and national socialism, classical liberalism, conservatism, Fabian socialism, Marxism-Leninism, and liberal democracy. Evaluates contemporary extremist ideologies of both left and right. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

PLS 211: U.S. Government I (3 cr.) — Teaches structure, operation, and process of national, state, and local governments. Includes in-depth study of the three branches of the government and of public policy. Part I of II. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

PLS 212: U.S. Government II (3 cr.) — Teaches structure, operation, and process of national, state, and local governments. Includes in-depth study of the three branches of the government and of public policy. Part II of II. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible.  Lecture 3 hours per week.

PLS 241: International Relations (3 cr.) — Teaches geographic, demographic, economic, ideological, and other factors conditioning the policies of countries and discusses conflicts and their adjustment. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

Practical Nursing

PNE 145: Trends in Practical Nursing (1 cr.) — Studies the role of the Licensed Practical Nurse. Covers legal aspects, organizations, and opportunities in practical nursing. Assists students in preparation for employment. Lecture 1 hour per week. Prerequisite: Completion of PNE 162. Co-requisite: PNE 164 and PNE 158.

PNE 158: Mental Health and Psychiatric Nursing (1 cr.) — Recognizes emotional needs of patients. Provides knowledge of the role that emotions play. Enables students to understand their own behavior as well as patient behavior. Lecture 1 hour per week. Prerequisite: Completed PNE 162. Corequisite: PNE 145 and PNE 164.

PNE 161: Nursing in Health Changes I (6 cr.) — Focuses on nursing situations and procedures necessary to assist individuals in meeting special needs related to human functions. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Total 12 hours per week. Prerequisite: Admission into the Germanna Practical Nursing Certificate Program.

PNE 162: Nursing in Health Changes II (11 cr.) — Continues the focus on nursing situations and procedures necessary to assist individuals in meeting special needs related to human functions. Lecture 6 hours per week. Laboratory 15 hours per week. Total 21 hours per week. Prerequisite: Completed PNE 161. Co-requisite: PNE 174.

PNE 164: Nursing in Health Changes IV (11 cr.) — Continues the focus on nursing situations and procedures necessary to assist individuals in meeting special needs related to human functions. Lecture 5 hours per week. Laboratory 18 hours per week. Total 23 hours per week. Prerequisite: Completion of PNE 162 and PNE 174. Co-requisite: PNE 145 and PNE 158.

PNE 174: Applied Pharmacology for Practical Nurses (2 cr.) Applies problem solving skills in preparing and administering medications. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 4 hours per week. Co-requisite: PNE 162.

Psychology

PSY 120: Human Relations (3 cr.) —Introduces the theory and practice of effective human relations. Increases understanding of self and others and interpersonal skills needed to be a competent and cooperative communicator. Prerequisite: Completion or co-enrolled with ENF 2 or ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

PSY 200: Principles of Psychology (3 cr.) — Surveys the basic concepts of psychology. Covers the scientific study of behavior, behavioral research methods and analysis, and theoretical interpretations. Includes topics that cover physiological mechanisms, sensation/perception, motivation, learning, personality, psychopathology, therapy, and social psychology. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week. NOTE: Students who take PSY 200 cannot receive credit for either PSY 201 or PSY 202. Students who take either PSY 201 or PSY 202 cannot receive credit for PSY 200.

PSY 215: Abnormal Psychology (3 cr.) — Explores historical views and current perspectives of abnormal behavior. Emphasizes major diagnostic categories and criteria, individual and social factors of maladaptive behavior, and types of therapy. Includes methods of clinical assessment and research strategies. Prerequisite: Completed PSY 200 or PSY 201. Lecture 3 hours per week.

PSY 216: Social Psychology (3 cr.) — Examines individuals in social contexts, their social roles, group processes and intergroup relations. Includes topics such as small group behavior, social behavior, social cognition, conformity, attitudes, and motivation. Prerequisite: Completed PSY 200 or PSY 201. Lecture 3 hours per week.

PSY 225: Theories of Personality (3 cr.) — Studies the major personality theories and their applications. Includes psychodynamic, behavioral, cognitive, and humanistic perspectives. Prerequisite: Completed PSY 200 or PSY 201. Lecture 3 hours per week.

PSY 226: Introduction to Counseling Relationships (3 cr.) — Introduces counseling theories and provides opportunity for their application through role- playing and supervised paraprofessional counseling experiences. Prerequisite: Completed a minimum of 9 credit hours in Psychology or instructor approval. Lecture 3 hours per week. Course offered in the Fall semester only.

PSY 230: Developmental Psychology (3 cr.) — Studies the development of the individual from conception to death. Follows a life-span perspective on the developmental of the person’s physical, cognitive, and psychosocial growth. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week. NOTE: Students cannot receive credit for both PSY 235 and PSY 230.

PSY 235: Child Psychology (3 cr.) — Studies development of the child from conception to adolescence. Investigates physical, intellectual, social and emotional factors involved in the child’s growth. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week. NOTE: Students cannot receive credit for both PSY 235 and PSY 230.

PSY 240: Health Psychology (3 cr.) — Studies the psychology of healthy behavior. Applies psychological principles to preventive health care. Covers topics such as exercise, nutrition, stress, lifestyles, and habits. Prerequisite: Completed PSY 200 or have instructor approval. Lecture 3 hours per week. Course offered in the Summer semester only.

PSY 255: Psychological Aspects of Criminal Behavior (3 cr.) — Studies psychology of criminal behavior. Includes topics such as violent and non-violent crime, sexual offenses, insanity, addiction, white-collar crime, and other deviant behaviors. Provides a background for law enforcement occupations. Prerequisites: Completed PSY 200 or 201. Lecture 3 hours per week.

PSY 290: Coordinated Internship (3 cr.) — Supervises on-the-job training in selected business, industrial or service firms coordinated by the College. Credit/practice ratio maximum 1:5 hours. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Completed PSY 226. Open only to students in Paraprofessional Counseling Career Studies Certificate program. Variable hours.

PSY 298: Seminar and Project (1-5 cr.) — Requires completion of a project or research report related to the student’s occupational objectives and a study of approaches to the selection and pursuit of career opportunities in the field. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Variable hours.

R


Religion

REL 100: Introduction to the Study of Religion (3 cr.) — Explores various religious perspectives and ways of thinking about religious themes and religious experience. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

REL 200: Survey of the Old Testament (3 cr.) — Surveys books of the Old Testament, with emphasis on prophetic historical books. Examines the historical and geographical setting and place of the Israelites in the ancient Middle East as background to the writings. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

REL 210: Survey of the New Testament (3 cr.) — Surveys books of the New Testament, with special attention upon placing the writings within their historical and geographical setting. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

REL 215: New Testament and Early Christianity (3 cr.) — Surveys the history, literature, and theology of early Christianity in the light of the New Testament. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

REL 216: Life and Teachings of Jesus (3 cr.) — Studies the major themes in the teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as recorded in the Gospels, and examines the events of his life in light of modern biblical and historical scholarship. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible.  Lecture 3 hours per week.

REL 217: Life and Letters of Paul (3 cr.) — Studies the journeys and religious thought of the apostle Paul. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

REL 230: Religions of the World (3 cr.) — Introduces the religions of the world with attention to origin, history, and doctrine. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

REL 231: Religions of the World I (3 cr.) — Studies religions of the world with attention to origin, history, and doctrine. Part I of II. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible.  Lecture 3 hours per week.

REL 233: Introduction to Islam (3 cr.) — Studies Islam in its historical, religious, and political dimensions and assists in the understanding of its contemporary vitality and attraction as a faith, a culture and a way of life. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

REL 235: Major Religious Thinkers (3 cr.) — Examines the works of one or more important people in religious thought. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

REL 237: Eastern Religions (3 cr.) — Studies major religious traditions of the East including Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Zen Buddhism. Includes an analysis of Eastern philosophy and approach to life. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

REL 238: Western Religions (3 cr.) — Studies major traditions of the west that may include, but not limited to Judaism, Zoroastrianism, Christianity, Near East, Greek and Roman, African, Native American, European Pagan, and New Age spirituality. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

REL 240: Religions in America (3 cr.) — Surveys various manifestations of religion in the American experience. Emphasizes concepts, problems, and issues of religious pluralism and character of American religious life. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

REL 246: Christianity (3 cr.) — Examines the origins and historical development of Christianity, its basic metaphysical and theological assumptions, its essential doctrines, and the present state of the church in the modern world. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

REL 247: History of Christianity (3 cr.) — Surveys the development of Christianity from its origins to the present. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

Russian

RUS 101: Beginning Russian I (5 cr.) — Develops the understanding, speaking, reading, and writing of Russian, and emphasizes the structure of the language. May include oral drill and practice. Part I of II. Lecture 5 hours per week.  May include one additional hour of oral practice per week. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible.

RUS 102: Beginning Russian II (5 cr.) — Develops the understanding, speaking, reading, and writing of Russian, and emphasizes the structure of the language.  May include oral drill and practice. Part II of II. Lecture 5 hours per week.  May include one additional hour of oral practice per week. Prerequisite: Completed RUS 101 or equivalent.

RUS 201: Intermediate Russian I (3 cr.) — Continues the development of the skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing of Russian. Class conducted in Russian. Prerequisite: Completed RUS 102 or equivalent.  May include oral drill and practice. Part I of II. Lecture 3 hours per week.

RUS 202: Intermediate Russian II (3 cr.) — Continues the development of the skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing of Russian. Class conducted in Russian. May include oral drill and practice. Part II of II. Prerequisite: Completed RUS 201. Lecture 3 hours per week.

S


Safety

SAF 126: Principles of Industrial Safety (3 cr.) — Teaches principles and practices of accident prevention, analysis of accident causes, mechanical safeguards, fire prevention, housekeeping, occupational diseases, first aid, safety organization, protection equipment and general safety principles and promotion. Lecture 3 hours per week.

Sociology

SOC 200: Principles of Sociology (3 cr.) — Introduces fundamentals of social life. Presents significant research and theory in areas such as culture, social structure, socialization, deviance, social stratification, and social institutions. Students who take SOC 200 cannot receive credit for either SOC 201 or SOC 202. Students who take either SOC 201 or SOC 202 cannot receive credit for SOC 200. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

SOC 210: Survey of Physical and Cultural Anthropology (3 cr.) — Examines physical characteristics and lifestyles of human ancestors and present populations. Explores cultures from around the world to study diverse adaptations made by humans. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Need not be taken in sequence. Lecture 3 hours per week.

SOC 211-212: Principles of Anthropology I-II (3 cr.) — Inquires into the origins, development, and diversification of human biology and human cultures. Includes fossil records, physical origins of human development, human population genetics, linguistics, cultures’ origins and variation, and historical and contemporary analysis of human societies. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

SOC 215: Sociology of the Family (3 cr.) — Studies topics such as marriage and the family in social and cultural context. Addresses the single scene, dating and marriage styles, child-rearing, husband and wife interaction, single-parent families, alternative life-styles. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week. Course offered in Fall semester only.

SOC 225: Gender and Sex Roles (3 cr.) — Analyzes influence of major social institutions and socialization in shaping and changing sex roles in contemporary society. Examines differential access to positions of public power and authority for men and women. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

SOC 266: Race and Ethnicity (3 cr.) — Investigates minorities such as racial and ethnic groups. Addresses social and economic conditions promoting prejudice, racism, discrimination, and segregation. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week.

SOC 268: Social Problems (3 cr.) — Applies sociological concepts and methods to analysis of current social problems. Includes delinquency and crime, mental illness, drug addiction, alcoholism, sexual behavior, population crisis, race relations, family and community disorganization, poverty, automation, wars, and disarmament. Prerequisite: ENG 111 eligible. Lecture 3 hours per week. Course offered in Spring semester only.

Spanish

SPA 101-102: Beginning Spanish I-II (4 cr.) — Introduces understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills and emphasizes basic Spanish sentence structure. Prerequisite for SPA 101: ENG 111 eligible. Prerequisite for SPA 102: Completed SPA 101 or minimum placement recommendation for SPA 102. May include an additional hour of oral drill and practice per week. Lecture 4 hours per week.

SPA 163: Spanish for Health Professionals I (3 cr.) — Introduces Spanish to those in the health sciences. Emphasizes oral communication and practical medical vocabulary. May include oral drill and practice. Lecture 3 hours per week.

SPA 201-202: Intermediate Spanish I-II (3 cr.) — Continues to develop understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Prerequisite: SPA 102 or equivalent. May include oral drill and practice. Prerequisite for SPA 201: Completed SPA 102 or minimum placement recommendation for SPA 201. Prerequisite for SPA 202: Completed SPA 201 or minimum placement recommendation for SPA 202. Lecture 3 hours per week. May include one additional hour of oral practice per week.

Student Development

SDV 100: College Success Skills (1 cr.) — Assists students in transition to college. Provides overviews of College policies, procedures, and curricular offerings. Encourages contacts with other students and staff. Assists students toward college success through information regarding effective study habits, career and academic planning, and other College resources available to students. May include English and math placement testing. Required for graduation and must be taken within first 16 credits at GCC. Lecture 1 hour per week.

SDV 101: Orientation to (Specific Discipline) (1 cr.) — Introduces students to the skills which are necessary to achieve their academic goals, to services offered at the college and to the discipline in which they are enrolled. Covers topics such as services at the college including the learning resources center; counseling, and advising; listening, test taking, and study skills; and topical areas which are applicable to the student’s particular discipline At GCC, the following topics are offered:  Allied Health, Online Learning, Early Childhood Education, and for Military Veterans. Course may substitute for SDV 100 requirement.  Lecture 1-3 hour per week.

SDV 104: Study Skills (1 cr.) — Assists students in planning strategies to overcome nonproductive study habits and in implementing positive study behaviors. Includes management, memory improvement, note taking, and test taking. Lecture 1 hour per week.

SDV 106: Preparation for Employment (1 cr.) — Provides experience in resume writing, preparation of applications, letters of application, and successfully preparing for and completing the job interview. Assists students in identifying their marketable skills and aptitudes. Develops strategies for successful employment search. Assists students in understanding effective human relations techniques and communication skills in job search. Lecture 1 hour per week.

SDV 107: Career Education (1 cr.) — Surveys career options available to students. Stresses career development and assists in the understanding of self in the world of work. Assists students in applying decision-making to career choice. Lecture 1 hour per week.

SDV 108: College Survival Skills (1-3 cr.) — Provides an orientation to the college. Introduces study skills, career and life planning. Offers an opportunity to engage in activities aimed at self-discovery. Emphasizes development of “coping skills”such as listening, interpersonal relations, competence, and improved self-concept. Recommended for students enrolled in developmental courses. Lecture 1-3 hours per week.

SDV 110: Orientation to Teaching as a Profession (3 cr.) — Introduces students to a career in teaching and education by allowing students to experience the components of the learner, the school environment and the classroom-teaching environment. Utilizes the Virginia Teachers for Tomorrow/ Teacher Cadet curriculum. Students participate in a 15-hour student teaching internship in a classroom at one of the levels between Kindergarten and grade 9. Lecture 3 hours per week.

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